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hi guys i was wondering ,can i say
"one thing leads to another"

or one thing leads to the other

thnaks a lot daniel

also i was wondering if i say " he should have moved there by now"

is the same that if i say "he must have moved there by now"
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Hello Daniel

I'm an English learner from Japan. I don't think I'm a right person to answer your questions. But as they have been left unanswered, I'd like to try to answer them. Could you allow me to do it?

"One thing leads to another" is a kind of proverb. Likely it says "many things happen in succession". I feel "one thing leads to the other" is rather odd. If you have two things, you can say about them: "one, the other". If three, "one, another, the other". If four, "one, another, another, the other". So "one thing leads to the other" would mean there are only two things to happen, which I feel is unnatural.

"He must have moved there by now" is "I'm sure he have moved there by now". "He should have moved there by now" can mean the same. But it can also mean "I regret that he has not moved there by now".

I hope I did not make a mistake in this answer and I hope also any moderator will come to give you a better answer than this.

paco
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"One thing leads to another" is a general statement.
"One thing leads to the other" is much less used and requires something ("the other thing") to have been mentioned previously.
First there's an argument. Then there's violence. One thing leads to the other.


In the example above, "the other" is "violence". Alternate forms are:

The one thing leads to the other.
The first thing leads to the second.
The former leads to the latter.

_________

He should have moved there by now.

1. It is [expected / probable] that he has moved there by now.
(If we go there, we are quite likely to see him.
If we go there, it would be somewhat surprising not to see him.)
2. It was [advisable for him / expected of him / his duty] to move there by now.
(Perhaps undesirable consequences will ensue for him if he has not yet moved.)
[This is the less likely reading given the sentence without context.]

He must have moved there by now.

1. The only possible conclusion is that he has moved there by now.
(All the evidence available to us indicates that he has moved there.)

There is a slight overlap between the two sentences marked [1.], but the "must" sentence states the situation much more conclusively.

CJ
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Comments  
thansk a lot guys,pretty helpful review,is there any web,book that you guys recommend that could help me even more?

thanks a lot.
daniel
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