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The original sentence read "Do you have to hurry for your next class or are you going to be late?" He revised it into "Do you have to hurry for your next class so (that) you're not late?". I have a problem with his "so (that) you're not late.". Isn't it better to use "so (that) you won't be late."? or, in order to retain the sense of the original question, isn't it better to use "or (do) you want to be late?"
Comments  
so that you're not / so that you won't be late: both are better than the original.
Hi,

The original sentence read "Do you have to hurry for your next class or are you going to be late?" He revised it into "Do you have to hurry for your next class so (that) you're not late?". I have a problem with his "so (that) you're not late.". Isn't it better to use "so (that) you won't be late."? or, in order to retain the sense of the original question, isn't it better to use "or (do) you want to be late?"

"Do you have to hurry for your next class or are you going to be late?" This grammar is OK. It's the meaning that is odd. The last part sounds a bit like you want to be late.

"Do you have to hurry for your next class so (that) you're not late?". This would sound OK in casual conversation, but I agree that 'won't' seems like a better choice when you think about it.

"Do you have to hurry for your next class so (that) you won't be late?" Fine. But the second part seems a bit unnecessary. Why not just ask 'Do you have to hurry for your next class?'

"Do you have to hurry for your next class or (do) you want to be late?" Again, this is correct grammar, but an odd meaning because people do not usually want to be late for a class.

Clive
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Can I use the second part "or you want to be late" as a sarcastic rhetorical question? Something to this effect: "So, (do) you wanna tell us now, or are we waiting for four wet bridesmaids?" (Monica to Rachel in Friends Season 1 episode 1)
Hi,

Yes, you can take that approach.

Clive
Thank you so much! I'll post another question shortly. Hoping for your response Clive.
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Yes, your idea is absolutely right. It is better to use "do you want to be late? One thinks we should keep in our mind though it is correction as per language rule but many English are not used to it.
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