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Hello,

I was wondering if we can use the determiner 'another' for plural nouns?
If not, what is another way of saying that there is more and not just one like in my sentences below? Would you correct them, please?

I have included another example of reptiles.
I have included another examples of reptiles.

Another question is how they survived.
Another questions are how they survived and where they moved.

Thank you.
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Comments  
No, you cannot: another means 'an' + 'other'. It is a form of the singular indefinite article. What you can do is this:

I have included (some) other examples of reptiles.
(Some) Other questions are how they survived and where they moved.
Thank you so much for your explanation and your correction of my sentences.

Based on wha't you've explained, I can say that the use of an article before 'another' in the following examples is incorrect or redundant. Could you please confirm?

I have included an another example of reptiles.
It will take an another two days to complete the survey.
X is the another symbol for disapproval.

Also, sometimes I hear some people say 'another two weeks' or 'another 10 years'. Therefore, these are incorrect?
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No you have not understood at all; please re-read my post. It says "another means 'an' + 'other'."

Another 2 weeks/10 years is fine because it is speaking of 2-week / 10-year units.
I'm sorry, I knew it was probably wrong, but I just wanted to confirm because I've heard of a movie, in our country, entitled 'The Anothers', spoof of 'The Others'.

Thank you for your help. It is really appreciated.
How about 'If I had another five dollars I could afford it'?
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How about 'If I had another five dollars I could afford it'?- $5 is also a single unit of money.

It is perfectly acceptable in any but the most formal contexts. It probably would not be used in legal or diplomatic texts, which must avoid any possible ambiguity, however far-fetched; but it's fine in anything less restricted than that. Here, for instance, is a footnote from an impeccably academic text, Jon B. Sherman, The Magician in Medieval German Literature, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2008:

Thorndike eventually continued his work, adding another three books that investigated the post medieval period up to the seventeenth century.

And it's not a modern vulgarism, either. Here's an extract from William Burt Harlow, An Introduction to Early English Literature, 1884, p.132:

By 1595 he had completed another three books of the "Faery Queen."

(I should perhaps add that this use is not confined to threes of others—“another three” was my Google search term.)

anonymousIt is perfectly acceptable in any but the most formal contexts.

What is? Your lengthy post does not seem to add anything to the discussion.

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