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For the first time, when reporting the doings in aue, ... so boring, so mundane, and so achingly detailed in minutia

"Minutia" or "minutiae"?

One of each, please. Hold the mayo.
I spotted that, along with another ***(1) or two, but, in conformity with my recent abstemiousness, let it pass.

The interesting question for me is the point at which "minutia" becomes (or became) an accepted plural. If it hasn't yet, it almost certainly will. Meanwhile, agenda, data, and media turn singular, with criteria limping along behind. Is this a great language or what?
Hey, Coop, what does Sis say?
(1) He does, after all, take credit for giving us an error or two per post on which to pounce.

Liebs
(See, I told you)
Liebs (See, I told you)

Bring back the tag lines, please. They provide pleasure to those of us who get pleasure from things like that.
Maria Conlon
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"Minutia" or "minutiae"?

One of each, please. Hold the mayo. I spotted that, along with another ***(1) or two, but, in conformity with ... turn singular, with criteria limping along behind. Is this a great language or what? Hey, Coop, what does Sis say?

Sis is no language mavenette. If she gets the meaning, she allows the form to slide. As far as I am concerned, if it passes spell-check, it goes. I don't deliberately make errors (1), but I do type in a word like that without looking it up for proper form so those who are not amused by my thoughts will at least have something useful to do whilst reading.
I have my own conception of the Rings. Errors are in a less fiery ring than boring sentences like "And so on for Ai, where R(An) = R(A1)/n, R(x) being defined as the resistance of x. For each I we consider the currents that flow through the various pieces of wire, by applying Kirchoff's Law etc.". That's close to the ninth ring.

(1) Well, I may salt the mine once in a while.
For the first time, when reporting the doings in aue, ... so boring, so mundane, and so achingly detailed in minutia

"Minutia" or "minutiae"? R.

Minutiae is the plural form of minutia (MWCD). If there were several instances of minutia present in each topic then minutiae would be correct. If he was referring to each topic having one minute detail then there would be, collectively, minutiae. If all recent topics shared the same minute detail, then minutia would be correct, if poorly phrased. Really, it is a matter of intent as either could probably work.OTOH, "...and so achingly detailed in a minute detail" can be confusing, as something with one detail would not usually be considered "detailed" in any but the most technical of senses. A sentence that includes "...and so achingly detailed in minute details" could be considered redundant except that it is saved by virtue of its description of the details (they are of the minute variety). I personally would favor "...so mundane in their achingly rampant minutiae." Would it be a grammatical improvement to write "because of" instead of "in?" "In" sounds fine to me, but I like sounds and I'm just a newbie 'round here.

Also, if I may, is it not the nature of english grammar to have many minute details? Would discussions of english grammar not tend to revolve around its minutiae? My biggest concern with the letter to Sis is that I can find no record of "the Colonel Sanders annual employee picnic," let alone a reference to the number of legs at such a shindig (I'm sure a chicken dance would be required). For one thing, Colonel Sanders is too dead to have picnics. For another, what was his company is now a company called KFC, which consists mostly of franchises that employ their own workers (and would probably have to have their own picnics).

Even Google seems to have no record of any such picnics. At this point, the somewhat idiomatic "more legs than the Colonel Sanders annual employee picnic" is in danger of losing all usefulness as the amount of said legs will have to be considered zero until contrary evidence is introduced. Is that not a more important issue than Mr. Cooper's position on the exact number of minute details in recent posts?

Save an idiom, eat a cynic.
Mike
I personally would favor "...so mundane in their achingly rampant minutiae."

Rampant? The literary lions here in aue are, on average, too elderly to balance on their left legs.
My biggest concern with the letter to Sis is that I can find no record of "the Colonel Sanders annual ... shindig (I'm sure a chicken dance would be required). For one thing, Colonel Sanders is too dead to have picnics.

An allusion, my incandescent friend, an allusion. An allusion to another thread wrapped in a simile but perhaps an enigma to you.
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Liebs (See, I told you)

Bring back the tag lines, please. They provide pleasure to those of us who get pleasure from things like that. Maria Conlon

Yeah, wot she said!

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I personally would favor "...so mundane in their achingly rampant minutiae."

Rampant? The literary lions here in aue are, on average, too elderly to balance on their left legs.

Rampant...lions...I get that one!
Well, perhaps if they had tails...in pictures lions seem to always have tails.
I'm sure there is a surgeon somewhere...
I thought that I was finding out "rampant" is another one of words. I looked it up and found that it could indeed mean "a: marked by a menacing wildness, extravagance, or absence of restraint b: widespread." (MWCD) You almost had me going for a second.
My biggest concern with the letter to Sis is that ... one thing, Colonel Sanders is too dead to have picnics.

An allusion, my incandescent friend, an allusion. An allusion to another thread wrapped in a simile but perhaps an enigma to you.

Disclaimer: The following commentary is tongue in cheek. I was going to hyphenate "tongue in cheek" but MWCD wouldn't let me. Dictionary.com hyphenates it. The latter calls it an adjective, the former calls it an adverb. I compromised. Let the war begin.
(Due to newsgroup participants' penchant for arguments about who meant what by saying this and that, lawyers handling newsgroup etiquette now require disclaimers for anything that might seem like an attack or criticism, but is, in fact, not.)Most of your letter is, to me, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. I'll admit that. I only picked topics from your letter which I figured I understood or could look up. As a teenager I was one of those employees and I never got to have a damn picnic. I googled "Colonel Sanders" references in this group. There was discussion about his title and discussion about his buckets and barrels. His commercials were mentioned, as well as his "thank-you kindly." I did not find anything about Colonel Sanders having an employee picnic, annual or otherwise.

I think there was one Colonel Sanders metaphor, or perhaps he has become an adjective. I didn't find any similes, for which I checked just in case you were being literal and hiding your intent inside a remodeled quote about Russia. It seems all of the a.u.e. discussions of "picnic" revolve around it having racial overtones and are not relevant to your current contextual application. So perhaps you were mentioning him in a completely different context to see if anybody would catch that it was a reference to a thread related only by name.

Tricky, tricky. But you didn't do your homework. There is no longer a Colonel Sanders, the company itself has moved on in name and recipes, and the employees mostly belong to franchisees, who rarely, if ever, let them have sponsored picnics. Not that the franchise employees were even mentioned in any part of your letter. Well, since you obviously have no information about the picnics...

Mike
record

An allusion, my incandescent friend, an allusion. An allusion to another thread wrapped in a simile but perhaps an enigma to you.

Most of your letter is, to me, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.

You overrate it. His letters to Sis are more like dog turds wrapped in cheap window dressing inside a newsgroup that deserves much better.
Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
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Rampant? The literary lions here in aue are, on average, too elderly to balance on their left legs.

Rampant...lions...I get that one! Well, perhaps if they had tails...in pictures lions seem to always have tails. I'm sure there ... by a menacing wildness, extravagance, or absence of restraint b: widespread." (MWCD) You almost had me going for a second.

I was actually thinking of the rampant lion in heraldry defined as: rearing on left hind leg with forelegs elevated and head usually in profile; "a lion rampant".
record

An allusion, my incandescent friend, an allusion. An allusion to another thread wrapped in a simile but perhaps an enigma to you.

Most of your letter is, to me, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. I'll admit that. I ... to see if anybody would catch that it was a reference to a thread related only by name. Tricky, tricky.

Not so tricky. There was a short thread on the word "legs" to mean a story that continues to be in the news past the time one would normally expect it to fade away. Since a picnic sponsored by Colonel Sanders would have both human and chicken legs in abundance, the "more" has meaning.
But you didn't do your homework. There is no longer a Colonel Sanders, the company itself has moved on in ... employees were even mentioned in any part of your letter. Well, since you obviously have no information about the picnics...

Similes are not required to be updated. If you use "as much of a stranger to me as Adam's off ox" as part of a simile. you are referring to a person that may never have existed and an ox that is certainly dead by now.
My Letters to Sis have been a recurring (feature) (waste of time to read) of aue since the first month I started posting here. They offer my summary of the threads of note and notable exceptions of posts of note.
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