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Minutiae is the plural form of minutia (MWCD). If there were several instances of minutia present in each topic then ... then minutia would be correct, if poorly phrased. Really, it is a matter of intent as either could probably work.

To avoid confusing my readers, I will be going with "res minutissimae" with a tacked-on "et contemptibiles" should that be justified. Context permitting, I will avail myself of "quisquilia" (a Latin neuter plural meaning "odds and ends"). But wait, what have we here? >

( http://www.demauroparavia.it/89795 )
quisquilia s.f.
1 CO faccenda minima, cosa di nessuna importanza: litigare,prendersela per delle quisquilie; perdersi in quisquilie

The plipping plural's pluralized.
Heaven preserve English from this noxious affliction!

R.
( http://www.demauroparavia.it/89795 ) quisquilia s.f. 1 CO faccenda minima, cosa di nessuna importanza: litigare, prendersela per delle quisquilie; perdersi in quisquilie The plipping plural's pluralized.

Not so fast!
My dastardly accusation may be false. What is this I see before me?

L&S: quisquiliae , arum, f. ( http://tinyurl.com/3lav8 )

Hence "quisquilia" (It.) could spring out of either "quisquilia" ( ), or "quisquiliae", or another word. But what of an English "quisquilia(e)"? We must work this lovely word into the English language if it not in it now, and it appears we have two choices and a possible 4 forms, singulars and plurals counted. This'll give the criteria-singularizers (cough) a headache.

Would someone be kind enough to check for presence in the OED?

Thanks,
R.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
( http://www.demauroparavia.it/89795 ) quisquilia s.f. 1 CO faccenda minima, ... per delle quisquilie; perdersi in quisquilie The plipping plural's pluralized.

Not so fast! My dastardly accusation may be false. What is this I see before me? L&S: quisquiliae , arum, ... plurals counted. This'll give the criteria-singularizers (cough) aheadache. Would someone be kind enough to check for presence in the OED?

"Quisquilious
Of the nature of rubbish or refuse."
Examples are: 1802-12, Bentham; 1832; and 1857, Fraser's Magazine ... "Besides garden fruit insects and worms, the Jay's diet is sufficiently quisquilious."
To my disappointment, quisquilia doesn't appear in OED1. I agree that we must now launch a determined campaign for the word's naturalization. I myself often dine upon tasty little morsels which many might reject as quisquilia. Such "quisquilia" include offal and the outer integuments of fruit and vegetables.
But note the above sort of contrary of the Oxford, or Harvard, comma: would our Fenland contemporaries take offence, do you think, if we were to refer to its absence as the "Cambridge, or Yale, comma"?

Mike.
>
WHAT???! What happened to C.J.? Why's Momma involved? Has he been banned from the internet or something? (I knows his rents was weiird!) Why hasn't he been here? I think Riggs offended him when he made up stories about C.J. & me...he told poor C.J. that I thought he was an old man. How horrible is that?!?!?!?!
>
NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, SML.
That should be: "Old Christopher Johnson (be(e(s))) fine. How *is* you?"
0R, mo' literally: "Young Christopher Johnson (be(e(s))) fine. How *is* you?"
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> WHAT???! What happened ... stories about C.J. & me...he told poor C.J. that I thought he was an old man. How horrible is that?!?!?!?!

Aggch! OLD!!! That really IS horrible!! Why don't us over-twenty-twos just jump off the pier and leave the world beautiful like God intended? Selfish, that's what we are.
Mike.
Rampant? The literary lions here in aue are, on average, too elderly to balance on their left legs.

Rampant...lions...I get that one! Well, perhaps if they had tails...in pictures lions seem to always have tails. I'm sure there ... by a menacing wildness, extravagance, or absence of restraint b: widespread." (MWCD) You almost had me going for a second.

Scottish lions are rampant, English ones are not.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Scottish lions are rampant, English ones are not.

I'm sure some people in here will know more of the history of the English lion, but it seems that this website is saying the Scots got their rampant lion from the English coat of arms. Allegedly, the Scottish coat of arms had up until that point used two unicorns.
http://www.sterlingtimes.org/memorable images14.htm

Mike
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Rampant...lions...I get that one! Well, perhaps if they had tails...in ... widespread." (MWCD) You almost had me going for a second.

I was actually thinking of the rampant lion in heraldry defined as: rearing on left hind leg with forelegs elevated and head usually in profile; "a lion rampant".

Right. I learned some new (to me) definitions of "rampant" and checked google for pictures. I never knew the word "rampant" had anything to do with heraldic lions. When I reread your post I noticed that you had used the word "lions" and assumed it was because you were cognizant of its relevance. I suggested tails so that the alliteratively local literary lions could better balance themselves when holding that pose.
record Most of your letter is, to me, a riddle ... reference to a thread related only by name. Tricky, tricky.

Not so tricky. There was a short thread on the word "legs" to mean a story that continues to be ... Since a picnic sponsored by Colonel Sanders would have both human and chicken legs in abundance, the "more" has meaning.

I'm familiar with that usage of "legs." It is also used similarly in golf, billiards, pool, and pretty much any context where something could (or should or did or will et cetera) travel a little farther than expected. "Get legs, ball!" "That ball sure grew/got legs." I thought about the human leg factor too. Many restaurants hold their company parties elsewhere. It is possible that human legs would be the only legs there.
But you didn't do your homework. There is no longer ... letter. Well, sinceyou obviously have no information about the picnics...

Similes are not required to be updated. If you use "as much of a stranger to me as Adam's off ... you are referring to a person that may never have existed and an ox that is certainly dead by now.

You:

Me:
I didn't find any similes, for which I checked just in case you werebeing literal and hiding your intent inside a remodeled quote about Russia.

Can I correctly assume your comment about updating similes is based on this exchange? I only intimated that you might have remodeled Churchill's line to suit your purpose. I was never concerned with updating similes.
My Letters to Sis have been a recurring (feature) (waste of time to read) of aue since the first month I started posting here. They offer my summary of the threads of note and notable exceptions of posts of note.

I read parts of most of them thanks to google's long memory. I appreciate writing that allows for reading on different levels. You obviously have a knack for including much detail into a seemingly innocuous sentence. I would guess that these letters are written for exercise as much as they are entertainment. Much of what is written in aue is, for the time being, beyond me in its breadth. I have no proper training in linguistics (I'm sure gasps of surprise are echoing off monitors the world round at this confession) or etymology. I simply enjoy the study and usage of the english language and would like to learn how to better use it. I appreciate the patience of aue's regulars, some of whom (refers to the indirect object, right?) have dealt with me already.
Mike
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