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> WHAT???! What ... stories about C.J. & me...he told poor C.J. that I thought he was an old man. How horrible is that?!?!?!?!

Liar

Charles Riggs
My Letters to Sis have been a recurring (feature) (waste ... threads of note and notable exceptions of posts of note.

Wanker
I read parts of most of them thanks to google's long memory. I appreciate writing that allows for reading on ... a seemingly innocuous sentence. I would guess that these letters are written for exercise as much as they are entertainment.

How old are you? not that there is anything wrong with being a young man in a group of oldsters.
I'd say you have a few things to learn about what constitutes true entertainment. A deceitful guttersnipe whose aim in life is to demean or discredit others is not a source I'd look to for entertainment.
Much of what is written in aue is, for the time being, beyond me in its breadth. I have no ... simply enjoy the study and usage of the english language and would like to learn how to better use it.

Well put (except for the "e") and to the point. I feel the same as you.
I appreciate the patience of aue's regulars, some of whom (refers to the indirect object, right?) have dealt with me already.

You could take that as a compliment.

Charles Riggs
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How old are you? not that there is anything wrong with being a young man in a group of oldsters.

I'm six years shy of Presidential eligibility (in America), but only since I wasn't and only until I'm not. I live in Michigan. I drive an extended-cab pick-up truck, but not just for the hyphens like some people.
I'd say you have a few things to learn about what constitutes true entertainment.

Partial list of things I do for/consider entertainment: shooting pool, reading, writing, swimming, watching movies, driving, skydiving, working, socializing, long walks in the woods, etc.
I don't think I'm that different from most.
A deceitful guttersnipe whose aim in life is to demean or discredit others is not a source I'd look to for entertainment.

I don't listen to Howard Stern either, but I will grant that most of his guests began demeaning themselves long before they wound up on his show. Also, his status of "deceitful" is dubious, at best.

MWCD (version 2.5, copyright 1994-6) actually has "guttersnipe" as meaning "street Arab" in addition to meaning a person of the lowest moral or economic station. They did not include "street Arab" in their online dictionary. Perhaps "street Arab" is not politically correct anymore. Since "guttersnipe" no longer means something politically incorrect I think I'm going to add it to my vocabulary. It has a certain vitriolic tone to it that can come in handy. It seems to me that when that word is used, it is not used lightly.
Much of what is written in aue is, for the ... and would like to learn how to better use it.

Well put (except for the "e") and to the point. I feel the same as you.

To which "e" do you refer? Obviously you and my spell-checker have different aims, as it is reporting zero aberrant .
I appreciate the patience of aue's regulars, some of whom (refers to the indirect object, right?) have dealt with me already.

You could take that as a compliment.

I do exactly that whenever possible. Arrogance is an important ambition for us "young men."
Mike
english

Well put (except for the "e") and to the point. I feel the same as you.

To which "e" do you refer? Obviously you and my spell-checker have different aims, as it is reporting zero aberrant .

Charles is objecting to the lack of capitalization of the "e" in "English". It is traditional in aue to note that there is a perceived error without specifying what the error is. Sometimes this is done with a reply consisting simply of "OY!".
Writing "English" as "english" is not really an error since it is the customary form to some. Normally, though, people who drive extended-cab pick-up trucks are expected to depress the shift key when typing the "e".
"How old are you? not that there is anything wrong with being a young man in a group of oldsters." Such minor errors are not worthy of note.
To which "e" do you refer? Obviously you and my spell-checker have different aims, as it is reporting zero aberrant .

Charles is objecting to the lack of capitalization of the "e" in "English". It is traditional in aue to note ... simply of "OY!". Writing "English" as "english" is not really an error since it is the customary form to some.

Well then, "English" it is.
Mike
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"How old are you? not that there is anything wrong with being a young man in a group of oldsters." Such minor errors are not worthy of note.

Getting into a war of semantics with a regular from aue who knows better but screwed up would probably end unfavorably for me. I'll let others fight those battles for now.
Also, I have seen people use punctuation like that on purpose.

When he realized she was a man he thought, "damn! that was close." I realize that in effect that is only slightly different that writing "damn, that was close!" or "damn! That was close." Some people are just that innovative.
Mike < doesn't mind if the censors replace "damn" with "durn it"
"How old are you? not that there is anything wrong ... of oldsters." Such minor errors are not worthy of note.

Getting into a war of semantics with a regular from aue who knows better but screwed up would probably end ... only slightly different that writing "damn, that was close!" or "damn! That was close." Some people are just that innovative.

A mid-sentence question mark or exclamation mark is acceptable, and has been a recent subject of discussion here. The example above (Charles's) is not an example of where one is appropriate, though. That's two sentences in anyone's book.
I'm sure some people in here will know more of the history of the English lion, but it seems that ... from the English coat of arms. Allegedly, the Scottish coat of arms had up until that point used two unicorns.

Do female unicorns have horns?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Getting into a war of semantics with a regular from ... "damn! That was close." Some people are just that innovative.

A mid-sentence question mark or exclamation mark is acceptable, and has been a recent subject of discussion here. The example above (Charles's) is not an example of where one is appropriate, though. That's two sentences in anyone's book.

In that case, he needs another space after the question mark. Perhaps he was trying to invent a question mark with a comma built in instead of a period.
Mike
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