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Here is a question from a test that I guess was constructed by a non-native speaker:

--What do you know about the world's population?
--I know China and India are the countries___ more than one billion.


A.with a population of B. with populations C. that have populations of D. which has a population of

No doubt C will be marked correct, but isn't A also acceptable? In other words, is the sentence below grammatically ok?

I know China and India are the countries with a population of more than one billion.

To insist that it has to be "populations" seems pedantic to me.
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Hi,

Yes, A and C are both OK.

Best wishes, Clive
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StunzI know China and India are the countries with a population of more than one billion.

To insist that it has to be "populations" seems pedantic to me.
Perhaps pedantic, but the version above may lead some to logically lump China and India in one entity (perhaps just for a short flash). Just barely, but IMO enough to try avoiding that.
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Comments  
StunzHere is a question from a test that I guess was constructed by a non-native speaker:

--What do you know about the world's population?
--I know China and India are the countries___ more than one billion.


A.with a population of B. with populations C. that have populations of D. which has a population of

No doubt C will be marked correct, but isn't A also acceptable? In other words, is the sentence below grammatically ok?

I know China and India are the countries with a population of more than one billion.

To insist that it has to be "populations" seems pedantic to me.
Perhaps, they would be clearer in meaning if they are written as follows:

I know China and India are the countries each with a population of more than one billion.
I know China and India are the countries which each have a population of more than one billion.
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