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Hello!

Can you please tell me what the following is:

1) Town Car

2)the house was run down and seedy

3) heavy mesh screen on the door Does screen here means board ?

4) dead bolts Why dead?

5)Ther was a smell in the place, even with the windows up and the air on. air conditioner?

Thank you for your time and effort

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Comments  
Heigh ho A.,

1. Not sure – maybe "a car for use in town"; as opposed to e.g. a Range Rover. (Though people round here use Range Rovers in town. They seem to think that pavements = "off road".)

2. The house had been allowed to deteriorate.

3. A lattice of wire, forming a screen.

4. Not sure – do you have more context? (Possibly "bolts that wouldn't move"?)

5. Not sure. Seems odd to open windows and have the aircon on. Do you have more context?

MrP
There is a particular kind of big, fancy car called a Lincoln Town Car.

A deadbolt lock has a metal bar that slides into a hole in the doorframe when you turn the key in the lock. It is more secure than the usual, spring-loaded lock that can be opened by turning a doorknob. It's kind of hard to describe, but I bet you could find a picture of it with Google.
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A picture:
Impressive.

I could use some of those.

MrP
MrPedantic5. Not sure. Seems odd to open windows and have the aircon on. Do you have more context?

If 'the place' was inside the car, the windows up would mean they're closed.
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Hi guys

Here's the context:

On a good day, even when you were downwind, the smell of the decomposing trash still reached your nose. Even with the windows up and the air on.

Another possibility, if the author is not downwind in a car with the windows rolled up and the air on, is-- in a house that has double-hung windows, where on a hot day you would lower (open) the upper sashes to let the interior hot air escape. (Hot air rises.)...
The author is not in the car, definitely. He comes to the bad side of the city and the description of the town follows.

But I don't know what could windows up mean? Thank you Davkett for trying to find logical explanation of my translation, but I wonder if I am right.
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