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Hi,

I'm looking for an adequate metaphore here:

Would not the marriage without a mistress squeal, tilt and sink? Is not the mistress the hidden dynamo of adultery as well as marriage, virus and vaccine?

It is a metaphore: marriage: ship. Is squeal OK? or should it be creak or crack?

Is dynamo OK?

This is also a translation. I'm practicing it. Please, chek my grammar too.
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Hi Antonia,

I'm looking for an adequate metaphore here: The real problem is that you have two different metaphors here.

Would not the marriage without a mistress squeal, tilt and sink? Is not the mistress the hidden dynamo of adultery as well as marriage, virus and vaccine?

It is a metaphore: marriage: ship. Is squeal OK? or should it be creak or crack? I suggest 'heel' instead of 'squeal'. It continues the 'ship' metaphor (a ship heels or leans over in the wind), and by luck it also rhymnes with 'squeal'!

Is dynamo OK? I'm not sure if the 'virus and vaccine' refers to 'adultery and marriage', or to the mistress. I think, to 'adultery and marriage', in the sense that adultery is the virus and marriage the vaccine. Anyway, 'dynamo' doesn't fit well at all with the idea of 'virus and vaccine'.How about 'the mistress as the hidden inflammation'? Although that does seem a little harsh on the mistress, and a tad easy on the husband.

Please, check my grammar too.
Seeems OK.

'Next to the pleasure of making a new mistress is that of being rid of an old one ' [Wycherly]

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you Clive, actually in the original text there is no dynamo, but engine. What do you think about engine in this context?
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Hi Antonia,

'Engine' doesn't fit with the image of 'virus . . .vaccine'. You need something related to infection, to the body.

Clive
Than inflamation is fine, isn't it? How does it sound to a native ear?
But what can be done with hidden inflamation. Can disease be hidden?
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Hello everybody especially Clive,

I am going back to this thread because I again need your help. If I incorporate inflamation in the sentence, which preposition should I use?

Would not the marriage without a mistress heel, tilt and drown? Is not the mistress the hidden inflamation of adultery as well as of marriage, virus and vaccine?

Thank you
Would not the marriage without a mistress squeal, tilt and sink? Is not the mistress the hidden engine of adultery as well as marriage, virus and vaccine?

Hi Antonija,
honestly, I do neither like nor understand the metaphor and comparison. As far as I comprehend it:

1 - marriage, virus, vaccine
marriage: what may become sick
virus: what would cause sickness
vaccine: what would prevent from sickness

Together, you have a marriage attacked by a virus, but the marriage keeps intact because of the vaccine.

2. - mistress, adultery, engine
adultery = marriage or virus?
engine = ?
mistress = virus or vaccine?

I just can not figure it out!

3.
Sure, the mistress can simultaneously be virus and vaccine to a marriage (as far as your text is concerned, at least!), so it could be the "engine" that makes a marriage changing. Certainly, a mistress is the core of adultery, because without a mistress there is not much of adultery, I guess.

Maybe much shorter and without the forced comparison the sentence could make sense:

Would not the marriage without a mistress heel, tilt and sink? Is not adultery both virus and vaccine to a marriage?

Kajjo
Thank you Kajjo,

Your suggestion seems fine and it sounds much better than the previous version.
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