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PEDESTRIAN:
(A) widely known
(B) strongly motivated
(C) discernible
(D) uncommon
(E) productive

(Choose a lettered word that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in the capital letters.)

I choose E, because "pedestrian" means ordinary, prosaic and lacking in imagination while "productive" means originative and creative. But some others prefer D. What do you think? Thank you.
Comments  
Hi,

Of these choices, I'd say D. A 'pedestrian' movie is a dull movie. An 'uncommon' movie sounds like the opposite. A 'productive' movie is incorret English.

Clive
Jeff,

The first definition for pedestrian is 'ordinary,common'. You're used to so many tricky ones, that the simplicity of this one escaped you.
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Jeff_999PEDESTRIAN:
(A) widely known
(B) strongly motivated
(C) discernible
(D) uncommon
(E) productive

(Choose a lettered word that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in the capital letters.)

I choose E, because "pedestrian" means ordinary, prosaic and lacking in imagination while "productive" means originative and creative. But some others prefer D. What do you think? Thank you.

I would say (B). Pedestrian implies slow and unhurried (ie at a "pedestrian" pace) and "strongly motivated" implies the opposite. None of them are good antonyms for pedestrian in my view however.
LeicesterLad,

You must be thinking about the noun 'pedestrian' (one who walks on foot).

These are, however, all adjectives in the list. 'Pedestrian', in its adjectival form, means 'common', 'ordinary'. Therefore, (D) is the obvious antonym.
No, I'm thinking of the adjective, which is derived from the noun. Maybe it's a US v UK thing, but in Britain you might say "Alonso's car is moving at a very pedestrian pace", meaning slowly.
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Yes, of course, as an adjective, 'pedestrian' can very well refer to qualities having to do with walking on foot, as in 'pedestrian pace' as you say-- which, compared to a moving car, is indeed a slow pace, but in itself has no derogatory notion of lacking motivation, or even, moving slowly.

But, as Clive initially points out here, the word also has another frequent use, meaning dull, ordinary, common. I'd be very surprised to learn that it does not have this usage, particularly in critical dialogue, in the UK.

It is actually the first definition in Merriam-Webster.

We don't need to go through any convoluted thinking to arrive at answer (D).
Thank you, Clive Davkett and LeicesterLad. Emotion: smile

DavkettJeff,

The first definition for pedestrian is 'ordinary,common'. You're used to so many tricky ones, that the simplicity of this one escaped you.


I guess so.

And another reason for that "uncommon" is 'more' correct than "strongly motivated' I think is "strongly motivated" just implies the "moving fast" which is the antonym of "moving slowly (i.e. pedestrian)" as LeicesterLad pointed out.