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I have gone through a lot of the old posts on the topic any. This is my understanding of any usage.

Any can be followed by a plural/uncountable/singular noun.

1. When any is used in interogative or negative form, it is usually followed by a plural/uncountable noun. Does it mean that the verb always agrees with the plural/uncountable noun if the noun is also a subject?

For example,

Do you have any kids that are older than 9 years old?

There aren't any good options.

Exceptional case.

He is amazed that there isn't any sales tax in MN.

There isn't any widely used password checker out there which has the ...

2. When it is used in declarative form, it is usually followed by a singular noun.

Any idea is a good idea => the verb agrees with the singular noun idea.

Exceptional case.

If you have any comments, please e-mail them to me. => the pronoun agrees with the plural noun comment

Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks
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any can take either a singular or a plural noun. The verb agrees with the subject
Do you have any kids that are older than 9 years old?

Inchoateknowledge, just a quick check. Is this sentence correct? Just want to make sure that "kids" is the subject of the subclause "that are older than 9 years old" and not "any".