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I can't see any grammatical error. I wrote on an internet forum "I don't hear the children of Russians who are born and raised in England making mistakes a native Russian speaker would make"

Someone who is trying to be clever claims there is a grammatical error in "making mistakes a native Russian speaker would make"

???
Comments  
I can't see the error either (I am a native English speaker). If I wanted to be REALLY pedantic about it, I might say it would be more elegant to say: "making mistakes that would be made by a native Russian speaker".

However, I think this is really a style decision, not strictly a grammatical issue.

The sentence as you originally wrote it made perfect sense to me, on first reading, and did not sound "foreign" or stilted.

I think your internet friend is going out of his way to find fault.Emotion: wink
I don't agree with your friend, it is fine grammar.

This part might be a bit confusing though:

"I don't hear the children of Russians who are born and raised in England ..."

Did you mean that the Russian parents are born and raised in England?

Or, did you mean "children who are born in England to Russian parents"?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"I don't hear the children of Russians who are born and raised in England ..."

Please let me know that in the above sentence it means the Russian parents are born and raised in England or children who are born in England to Russian parents.
Hi,
"I don't hear the children of Russians who are born and raised in England ..."
the above sentence means the children of russians and not the russians themselves. in such sentences, it is always advisable to go through the sentence as a whole to get the meaning right.