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'If you do that any more I'll punch you, OK?' is common in my region.

I would take that as the other sort of "any" plus "more," like "some more." "If you feed that dog any more food, he'll burst." That's different from the time word: I'm not going to feed that dog anymore. You do it.

In UK usage, 'If you feed that dog any more..' is ambiguous between more time and more food, and I've never seen it written as one word.

Paul
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masahiko (Email Removed) wrote on 30 Nov 2003:
Let me ask the same sentence from a different angle. If you have two sets of sheets, and you have ... between this expression and " I don't have any more clean sheets" if it is said in the same context?

First, you have to provide a context. Here are a couple of scenarios with different contexts.
"I wet the bed last night, so I need a cleansheet". Then you can say "I don't have any more clean sheets. (I had only two. You used one and I used the other.)"
2. You want to change your sheet for some reason. You look into yourlinen closet and discover that you have no more clean sheets. Then you can say to yourself: "I don't have any more clean sheets. (I guess I'd better go out and buy another one or two.)"
3. One of your friends comes over and asks if he can borrow a cleansheet for the night. You say: "I don't have any clean sheets. (I'm using one sheet and my guest is using the other. I don't have any other sheets, clean or dirty.)"
4. The local government sheet inspector comes around and asks toverify the number of clean sheets you have in your linen closet. "How many clean sheets do you have?" You have to say "I don't have any clean sheets (in my linen closet)".
So you can see that if either you or your guest would like one more clean sheet, it is appropriaqte to say "I don't have any more clean sheets". If your friend, who is not using one of your sets of sheets, asks to borrow a clean sheet for the night, or if the local government clean sheet inspector asks how many clean sheets you have, you don't say "I don't have any more clean sheets" but "I don't have any clean sheets".
Can you see the subtle difference here? Nobody would think you wrong for saying "I don't have any more clean sheets" in #3, because you know that because you used your only two sets, you don't have any more to lend to your friend. You might feel like explaining to your friend that you cannot lend him a clean sheet because you're using one and your guest is using the other; then it's appropriate to begin with "I don't have any more clean sheets".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
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Don't you want those chips? All the more for me, then.

And therein lies the fallacy of trying to explain the language in terms of nouns, something that acts like a ... should matter, to its speakers. The "rules" do, if anything, confuse those who seek a "better" way of communicating .


Anyway, in this thread the bottom line is that I was carelessly wrong in saying that "more" is a noun in "There aren't any more eggs," and Mike Oliver was right in calling me on it. In that sentence, "more" is an adjective and "any" is an adverb.
I assume Mike didn't intend to imply that "more" is always an adjective no matter how it's used.

Theodore de Bere, LA, SC (Email Removed)
On 30 Nov 2003 09:35:53 GMT, CyberCypher
Let me ask the same sentence from a different angle. ... clean sheets" if it is said in the same context?

"I wet the bed last night, so I need a clean sheet". Then you can say "I don't have any ... and your guest is using the other; then it's appropriate to begin with "I don't have any more clean sheets".

What a long-winded explanation for something that's very simple. The addition of "more" simply means that there have been sheets and there aren't any now.
People criticize Walker for extraneous writing, but at least he adds something as his words progress down the screen. Frank, who must have been three sheets to the wind as he wrote this, adds nothing except a barn-beating.
'If you do that any more I'll punch you, OK?' is common in my region.

I would take that as the other sort of "any" plus "more," like "some more." "If you feed that dog any more food, he'll burst." That's different from the time word: I'm not going to feed that dog anymore. You do it.

"I don't buy books anymore. I don't need any more books. Any more would be too many. Anymore, I just don't have room for them."
(The usage in the last sentence is spottily regional over most of the US.)
Pace John Lawler, I choose to view the spelling "any more" for the adverb an error. That's the only way I've seen it in recent decades in US publications.
Edward D. Johnson, in his excellent The Handbook of Good English , says
any more vs. anymore The one word form anymore is now accepted as standard when it is an adverb
modifying a verb in negative sentences and in
questions:
( . . . )
The two-word form any more was formerly the only one considered correct, and those who want to
continue to use it in all constructions can do so, though publishing houses generally accept or prefer the one-word form when it is correct.
( . . . )
The one-word form has the advantage of occasionally preventing ambiguity. He can't eat any more can mean either that he's had all he can eat for the
moment or that he's wasting away, whereas He can't eat anymore can have only the second meaning.
Now, before someone leaps to their keyboard to say that the distinction exists only in writing, let me say that that's true so far as spelling goes, but there are clues in speech that are nearly impossible to convey in conventional writing.
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( . . . )
Pace John Lawler, I choose to view the spelling "any more" for the adverb an error. That's the only way I've seen it in recent decades in US publications.

I meant to say, of course, that the one-word form is the only one I've seen.
Don't you want those chips? All the more for me, then.

And therein lies the fallacy of trying to explain the language in terms of nouns, something that acts like a noun, or whatever.

What part of speech any given word is, is determined by its function in a sentence. If you're going to discuss parts of speech without the context of a specific sentence, sometimes the best you'll come up with is a guideline.

Dena Jo
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If you have two sets of sheets, and you have used one and the guest has used the other, do you say I don't have any more clean sheets.

This means, "I have no more clean sheets".
What is the difference between this expression and " I do not have clean sheets any more?"

This means, "I no longer have any clean sheets".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
What is the difference between this expression and " I do not have clean sheets any more?"

This means, "I no longer have any clean sheets".

No, that's not right. It means, "I no longer have clean sheets." A subtle difference.
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