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Why - slightly off the subject but not much - should constructions change as they do after negatives/questions? 'Any', for ... Latin and Greek; word orders change, etc. - but why? (And don't you tell me it's logic, coz it ain't!!!)

Try looking at what John Lawler says about "negative polarity." http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/aue.html

Best wishes Donna Richoux
Try looking at what John Lawler says about "negative polarity." http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/aue.html

Thanks - interesting.

Paul
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Beating around the barn is Hoosier for taking the long way around. There are 3,684 ways to use "barn" in Indiana.

But only one bush?

We in the US have had two Bushes so far, and look where it's got us.

Bob Lieblich
Anyone for beating Bushes?
Certainly there are grammatical utterances that juxtapose "the" and "more"; ... same sense that you'd use "the car" or "the compactum".

Rules like that don't hold up for all nouns. "Nirvana" is a noun. I think there's only one Nirvana, so what would "the Nirvana" mean or "a Nirvana" mean? If "Nirvana" isn't a good example, I'm sure there are others. How about "Easter"? Could we ever say meaningfully "an Easter", or "the Easter"?
The Eleventh Collegiate says
noun : any member of a class of words that typically can be combined with determiners to serve as the
subject of a verb, can be interpreted as singular or plural, can be replaced with a pronoun, and refer to an entity, quality, state, action, or concept
"Typically" is the key word there. It leaves the door wide open for things to be called nouns that don't fit most of the given conditions.
It's like saying a word isn't an adjective unless it has comparative and superlative forms, or that it can stand before and modify a noun. There are full-fledged adjectives that can't be used attributively but can be used in the predicate. And there are adjectives that don't have comparison forms.
One example of the latter is "other". We can say "the other one", but we can't say "the otherer one", "the otherest one", "the more other one", or "the most other one".

What are some examples of adjectives that can be used predicatively but not attributively? I've read of examples, but I'm not remembering any of them at the moment.
But only one bush?

We in the US have had two Bushes so far, and look where it's got us.

Is "Bushes" the correct pluralization? Maybe "Bush" should be a collective noun as in "Now that Thanksgiving is over, we have two birds in the Bush."
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Beating around the barn is Hoosier for taking the long way around. There are 3,684 ways to use "barn" in Indiana.

But only one bush? m.

We have a quayle, but no bush.
"I don't buy books anymore. I don't need any more books. Any more would be too many. Anymore, I just don't have room for them." (The usage in the last sentence is spottily regional over most of the US.)

But "I just don't have room for them anymore" is probably standard all across the US.
So aside from negative polarity stuff, there's some regionality in where you can place the adverb.
MO> Certainly there are grammatical utterances that juxtapose MO> "the" and "more"; the point is that you can't use "the more" MO> in the same sense that you'd use "the car" or "the compactum".
Rules like that don't hold up for all nouns. "Nirvana" is a noun. I think there's only one Nirvana, so ... good example, I'm sure there are others. How about "Easter"? Could we ever say meaningfully "an Easter", or "the Easter"?

Yes, proper nouns are a little different. Probably they should be considered a different part of speech from common nouns; even count and uncount nouns are perhaps different parts of speech. But all of these are much closer together than "more" is to any of them. "More" has a lot more in common with comparative adjectives than it has with nouns.
As I say, I'm reluctant to consider "more" a comparative adjective either, because it has no fixed content (unlike, say, "greener", which is a true comparative adjective). I would call it perhaps a "comparative quantifier", the comparative form of the quantifiers "much" or "many".
It's like saying a word isn't an adjective unless it has comparative and superlative forms, or that it can stand ... one", but we can't say "the otherer one", "the otherest one", "the more other one", or "the most other one".

Perhaps "other" is already comparative? But I don't really buy that "other" is an adjective, for reasons similar to those already elucidated.
The standard list of parts of speech doesn't nearly cover it; there need to be many many more. In particular the motley collection of words lumped together as "adverbs" needs to be broken up into quite a few categories. It's ludicrous to say that "yes" is the same part of speech as "slowly"; they have very little in common in terms of their semantic or syntactic function. I would call "slowly" the true adverb, and find other names for "yes", "here", "tomorrow", "thus", etc.
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"I don't buy books anymore. I don't need any more ... last sentence is spottily regional over most of the US.)

But "I just don't have room for them anymore" is probably standard all across the US. So aside from negative polarity stuff, there's some regionality in where you can place the adverb.

Yes, awhile after I posted, I realized I had picked a not-so-pretty-good example to try to illustrate positive "anymore". I should have said something like "Anymore, all of my bookshelves are full".
That typifies the usage that's spottily regional over most of the US (as shown in The Dictionary of American Regional English , Volume 1, page 73).
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