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"Maria Conlon" (Email Removed) wrote on 01 Dec 2003:
"Skitt" wrote, in part:

Yeah, I (and Theodore) was misled by

Serious question: Is the use of "was" correct in Skitt's sentence? I think it is, but every time I find myself writing something like that, I end up reconstructing the sentence to avoid what sounds wrong.

Take away the parentheses without changing the structure and it's wrong, but translate the praentheses into the corresponding structure and you get "Yeah, I, as well as Theodore, was misled" and it's correct. The parentheses remove "and Theodore" from the sentence as a coordinated and conjoined subject. Had Skitt wanted to make a sentence with a plural subject, he would have begun "Yeah, (both) Theodore and I were misled".

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
Rules like that don't hold up for all nouns. "Nirvana" is a noun. I think there's only one Nirvana, so ... good example, I'm sure there are others. How about "Easter"? Could we ever say meaningfully "an Easter", or "the Easter"?

This is where it gets tricky. The Buddhist Nirvana is, I believe, a singularity. (It may be so in the mathematical and astrological senses as well). But it is also used figuratively.
OED : >

This is before we make reference to the late Mr Cobain's beat combo.

Easter? One Easter I hid chocolate rabbits for the children to find. I remember the Easter we had snow in Lancashire. Scarcely an Easter goes by without my thinking of the time when ... This has happened to me four Easters in a row ...

John Dean
Oxford
De-frag to reply
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OED : << 1895 Balfour Foundations Belief 64 The very Nirvana of artistic imagination, without desire and without pain. 1902 ... by without my thinking of the time when ... This has happened to me four Easters in a row ...[/nq]
Okay, I give.
Matti Lamprhey:
It's something we should welcome and encourage, inasmuch as it makes the language more regular.

John Lawler:
We should only welcome regularity if we want the language to be regular. Personally, I like irregularity in language. It's more interesting.

And, by making his subject area more complicated, augments the value of John's occupation as a linguistics professor. In other words, his position on this issue is entirely one of self-interest and must be given no weight.
He probably voted for for President, too.
-)

Mark Brader, Toronto > "Mark is probably right about something, (Email Removed) > but I forget what" Rayan Zachariassen
Merriam-Webster, which is of course a US company, has this usage note:

(elided article about use of "anymore" [/nq]^^^^^^
Ooooh! Wordy Walker-Talker every thinking person's favorite foeman (which is not Negro talk for "foreman") doesn't just "snip" or "cut" or "delete" as we common mortals do: he "elides." Is that wacky guy cool, or what?
A truly careful writer would not use the pretentious polysemous verb "to elide" to mean "to snip," but what can one expect from that manifestly hebephrenic weirdo?
Merriam is Merriam. The use occurs, commonly, but is still, I think I can safely say, regarded as colloquial or dialectal, and like to stay that way a long time, if not forever.

Am I the only one who believes that a self-described "careful writer" who writes such a terrible, convoluted sentence should be immediately strung up by his balls?
Cordially,

You lying fraud.

R. (R.e.y) A.man
Wordy Walker-Talker's #1 Foeman
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thus spake R. A.man:
Am I the only one who believes that a self-described "careful writer" who writes such a terrible, convoluted sentence should be immediately strung up by his balls?

Probably. I think a little derision goes a long way.
Simon R. Hughes
Anyway, in this thread the bottom line is that I was carelessly wrong in saying that "more" is a noun ... Oliver was right in calling me on it. In that sentence, "more" is an adjective and "any" is an adverb.

I don't quite agree - I don't think "any" is an adverb (modifying "more"); it's a determiner, performing the same role it has in just plain "any eggs".
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Rules like that don't hold up for all nouns. "Nirvana" is a noun. I think there's only one Nirvana, so what would "the Nirvana" mean or "a Nirvana" mean?

There are a bunch of Google hits for things like "the Nirvana of Lord Mahavira" and "the Nirvana of authentication security".
If "Nirvana" isn't a good example, I'm sure there are others. How about "Easter"? Could we ever say meaningfully "an Easter", or "the Easter"?

Easily - "Do you remember the Easter when I dropped a giant chocolate bunny from the top of the Chrysler Building?"
Your point is taken, though. Proper nouns can only be used with nonzero determiners in very restricted circumstances, but they're still nouns.
What are some examples of adjectives that can be used predicatively but not attributively? I've read of examples, but I'm not remembering any of them at the moment.

There's a family of them beginning with "a-". "Asleep", "awake", "afraid". I'm not sure about "aware".
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
If you have two sets of sheets, and you have used one and the guest has used the other, do you say I don't have any more clean sheets.

That means that all your sheets are dirty.
What is the difference between this expression and " I do not have clean sheets any more?"

That means that you once had clean sheats, but do not have them any longer.

The first refers to the number of sheets, the second refers to time.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
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