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Hi!

"Hey, neat," Dennis said respectfully. It was a tone Hal rarely got from the boy anymore himself. (The Monkey, Stephen King)

What should the underlined part mean? Does it mean, "It was a tone Hal rarely got from the boy any more than from himself", meaning, "Hal and the boy both did not use the tone"?

If it is to be put without any omissions in full sentence, what should that be?
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Anymore = any longer; nowadays

Hal rarely hears the tone from the boy now.
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pructus It was a tone Hal rarely got from the boy anymore himself.
It was a tone that Hal himself got only rarely from the boy any longer.

Others may still have got that tone from the boy, but not Hal.
Hal may have got that tone from the boy more frequently during some previous period of time, but not now anymore. Now he got that tone only rarely.

"To get that tone" refers back to the word respectfully. The boy was no longer using a tone of respect toward Hal except rarely.

CJ
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Thanks a lot Mister Micawber and CalifJim....

Now, I see how this sentence is composed....

And I had to have one more question on this. Why himself is used here? It's like, without "himself", it would have been better to understand.

Is it used to imply that the boy might be using the tone to other people than Hal?

Or just used without specific purpose?
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pructusIs it used to imply that the boy might be using the tone to other people than Hal?
Yes. That's my take on it.

CJ
Thanks.... How dumb I was! You already said that.... I didn't get that you were saying about "himself".