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Would it ever be correct to say the following...

"She doesn't work no more."

Or should it be "any more"?

Under what circumstances would it be correct to say "no more" vs. "any more"?
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It should be "She doesn't work any more."

The problem with "She doesn't work no more." is that there is a double negative in the sentence (i.e. 'not' and 'no').

If you want to use 'no more' then compare the usage in the following two sentences, which mean the same thing:

1. "There are no more eggs in the basket."

2. "There aren't any more eggs in the basket"
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You need She doesn't work anymore because the sentence is negative (doesn't). In this context in American English, anymore is a single word.
turtlkkyUnder what circumstances would it be correct to say "no more" vs. "any more"?
You need quite a different context for "no more".
John has two shirts. Jack has two shirts. Jack has no more shirts than John does.
CJ
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Note that in British English, "She doesn't work any more" is perfectly acceptable. American English uses the single word anymore in this context, but you will find both versions used in British English.

The following example is taken from "The Collins English Dictionary", under the entry for "any more":

he does not work here any more

'No more' can be used when a statement is made in the affirmative (ie, We will go there no more). If a sentence is in the negative, or a question, it requires the use of 'any more' (ie, We will not go there any more; Do you want any more water?)

'She doesn't work no more' is incorrect because the expression 'no more', which can be correctly used in the affirmative, is being used with a negative statement.

Eddy Randrup

new orleans
But can't you say 'Is there no more water in the jug?' Isn't that a question?
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AnonymousBut can't you say 'Is there no more water in the jug?' Isn't that a question?
Yes. That's correct. Also,

Isn't there any more water in the jug?

CJ
That is improper grammar.
Anonymousno more
A famous historical quote by Native American leader Chief Joseph.

Hear me, my chiefs! I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever.
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