+0
a. I don't want to go for a run, whether we go for a short run or not.

b. I don't want to go for a run, regardless of whether we go for a short run or not.

c. I don't want to go for a run. Whether we go for a short run or not is irrelevant.

d. I don't want to go for a run. Whether we go for a short run or not doesn't change this fact.

e. I don't want to go for a run. Regardless of whether we go for a short run or not is irrelevant.

Any nuances?

Which is preferred?

Thanks
+0
First, put your thought into a single sentence. Then see about the best way of saying it. In any case, the word you want is "regardless" because you are emphasizing that you don't want to run. The length is a secondary consideration. I would simply say:

I don't want to go for a run, regardless of how short it is.
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks, but does 'whether...' give the same meaning as 'regardless...', both express that you don't want to go for a run, if it is short or long.?
You can use "whether" in a parallel form to mean "regardless." However, you would probably need to phrase it differently to be clear. "Whether" applies to particular named options; "regardless" applies to all options. I would say it as:

I do not want to go for a run, whether or not the run is short or long.