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I know this is an English forum; and I'm reading English medical textbooks. But in those books I encounter a lot of Latin words (especially nouns for diseases and materia medica). I don't know how to pronounce them. So are there any online dictionaries available for us to check the pronunciation of Latin words?

Thank you very much for your help!
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A couple of sites on Latin pronunciation:

http://www.saltspring.com/capewest/pron.htm
http://www.thebookmarkshop.com/latin/latinpronunciation.htm

Medline gives pronunciation guides to medical terms, which will include those that are Latin : http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mplusdictionary.html
I would add that the pronunciation of medical terms often differs from the traditional Latin pronunciation(s).

For instance, doctors seem mostly to pronounce the epithet in Clostridium difficile as "díff-i-séel", in a slightly French kind of way; whereas it has four syllables in classical Latin (either "diff-í-sill-e", "diff-í-kill-e", or "diff-ítch-ill-e", depending on your place of education).

MrP
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MrPedanticI would add that the pronunciation of medical terms often differs from the traditional Latin pronunciation(s).

For instance, doctors seem mostly to pronounce the epithet in Clostridium difficile as "díff-i-séel", in a slightly French kind of way; whereas it has four syllables in classical Latin (either "diff-í-sill-e", "diff-í-kill-e", or "diff-ítch-ill-e", depending on your place of education).

MrP
Thanks for this, MrP!
Cannot imagine "difficile" pronounced as "díff-i-séel" or "diff-í-sill-e" Emotion: surprise
At my high school I was taught that "diff-í-kill-e" was the correct pronounciation in Classical Latin, and "diff-ítch-ill-e" the correct one in Medieval Latin. As far as I know, Classical Latin is still taught in Germany, where there's a strong tradition of philological studies; in Italy, Medieval Latin is mostly used, maybe because it's more similar to Italian. Emotion: smile

I'd be curious to learn something about the way Latin is being taught in the UK or in the US.
Thank you again.
Tanit, here's a site for you to start with: http://www.arlt.co.uk /
Thanks, Feebs Emotion: smile

I downladed some mp3's from that website.
I must say that there are huge differences ... the way those poems are read is pretty far from the way we'd have read them in school. Emotion: smile

Not sure I'd have recognised them if I hadn't know what they were reading. Emotion: stick out tongue
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
PS: Sorry, Maple, for hijacking your thread Emotion: smile
Thank you very much, Feebs11 and MrPedantic!Emotion: smile[C]

(I posted this question elsewhere but no one has touched it there. English Forums are the best, always!)

Hi, Tanit, no need to say sorry. Your way of hijacking is legitimate!Emotion: wink
TanitCannot imagine "difficile" pronounced as "díff-i-séel" or "diff-í-sill-e" Emotion: surprise
At my high school I was taught that "diff-í-kill-e" was the correct pronounciation in Classical Latin, and "diff-ítch-ill-e" the correct one in Medieval Latin. As far as I know, Classical Latin is still taught in Germany, where there's a strong tradition of philological studies; in Italy, Medieval Latin is mostly used, maybe because it's more similar to Italian. Emotion: smile

I'd be curious to learn something about the way Latin is being taught in the UK or in the US.
Thank you again.
As far as I know, the "hard" pronunciation is still preferred, in UK schools; which makes more sense in the context of Roman orthography, transliterations from the Greek, contemporary grammatical texts, etc. But as you say, church Latin seems to favour the "diff-ítch-ill-e" style.

Perhaps oddest of all are the pronunciations of gardeners and biologists.

MrP
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