About The Beatles lyric, Any Time At All:

1.Is it possible to say "any time in/of all" instead of "any time at all"? Is the word idiom?

2.I understand the whole lyric means "Any time is fine, so just phone me". Is it correct?

3."If you need somebody to love, just look into my eyes, I'll be there to make you feel right."

What does the sentence of the bold line mean? I am not sure about the meaning of "right" in here.

4."There is nothing I won't do."

It means "I'll do anything for you.", right?

5."If you're feeling sorry and sad, I'd really sympathise. Don't you be sad, just call me tonight."

What does this phrase, Don't you be sad, mean? "I don't make you sad." or "Don't feel sad"?

Thank you for your help.
1.Is it possible to say "any time in/of all" instead of "any time at all"?-- No. Is the word idiom?- Yes.

2.I understand the whole lyric means "Any time is fine, so just phone me". Is it correct?-- Yes.

3."If you need somebody to love, just look into my eyes, I'll be there to make you feel right."

What does the sentence of the bold line mean? I am not sure about the meaning of "right" in here.-- 'Right' = good, satisfied.

4."There is nothing I won't do."

It means "I'll do anything for you.", right?-- Right.

5."If you're feeling sorry and sad, I'd really sympathise. Don't you be sad, just call me tonight."

What does this phrase, Don't you be sad, mean? --"Don't feel sad"
Thank you very much for your answer. Could I please ask additional questions?

I would just like to confirm, but does the idiom 'any time at all' mean 'any time in a day'?

"Don't you be sad" means "Don't feel sad"? I didn't know the grammar.

I think "Don't you be sad(?)" is an interrogative sentence, and wonder why it isn't "Aren't you sad(?)".

"sad" is an adjective, so it simply becomes "Aren't you sad(?)", I suppose.

Is "Don't you be sad" a spoken language?

Thank you.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I would just like to confirm, but does the idiom 'any time at all' mean 'any time in a day'?-- No, it means any time, completely!

"Don't you be sad" means "Don't feel sad"? -- Yes.

I didn't know the grammar. I think "Don't you be sad(?)" is an interrogative sentence-- No, it is an imperative sentence: Don't (you) be sad. Imperatives can sometimes have subjects.

Is "Don't you be sad" a spoken language?- Spoken and written.
Thank you so much for your reply!

Then, does at all of any time at all only emphasise or stress the word, any time?

Mister Micawber Imperatives can sometimes have subjects.
It makes sense. Does imperative sentences of adjective become "Do/Don't (you) be "?

e.g. "Do (you) be angry. Why do you shut up, though he said to you that?"
Then, does at all of any time at all only emphasise or stress the word, any time? -Yes, that's right.

Does imperative sentences of adjective become "Do/Don't (you) be "?-- Yes, that's OK.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I understand. Many thanks, Mister Micawber!