+0
Hi, thanks for stopping by!!

I've just received a spam mail and it says "...............you will not get anymore of our emails if you go here........"
Can someone please tell me what this of is for?
1 2 3
Comments  
KotoHi, thanks for stopping by!!

I've just received a spam mail and it says "...............you will not get anymore of our emails if you go here........"
Can someone please tell me what this of is for?

'anymore of our emails' means 'emails sent by us'; 'of' means 'from us'.

Yoong Liat'anymore of our emails' means 'emails sent by us'; 'of' means 'from us'.

Thanks:) Yoong Liat!

But I still don't get it.. Is anymore of an idiom?
If not, what is this of grammatically?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
The word 'of' is used to indicate possession.

These stamps of mine are invaluable. (These stamps belonging to me are invaluable.)
I think the technical name is the "partitive" use of of.

Give me more of that sugar. = Give me a greater quantity taken from the quantity you have of that sugar.
Can we have less of the lemon chicken and more of the mu shu pork? = Can we have a lesser quantity of the lemon chicken and a greater quantity of the mu shu pork?
I would like some of the chicken you put in the refrigerator last night. = I would like an indefinite quantity taken from the chicken that you put in the refrigerator last night.
Peter doesn't want to receive any more of those letters from Mary. = Peter doesn't want to receive any additional letters such as those letters that he has been receiving from Mary.

In English you can't put some, less, or more together with determiners like the, that, my, our, etc. You can say some chicken, but not some the chicken, so if you want to indicate some quantity taken from the chicken, you say some of the chicken. Likewise you can say not ... any more emails, but not not ... any more our emails, so this becomes not ... any more of our emails.

Hope that helps.

CJ
I think I'm getting the picture here.
So, "of "of "most of" is also considered as "partitive" ?

①Most people I met there
②Most of the people I met there
I believe①and②are correct but different in meaning.
Correct?

Thank you..
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Yoong LiatThe word 'of' is used to indicate possession.

These stamps of mine are invaluable. (These stamps belonging to me are invaluable.)

Thanks! Now, it makes sense Emotion: smile
Koto"...............you will not get anymore of our emails if you go here........"
Hi Koto

I would prefer:
You will not get any more of our emails... because of the of. Anymore, spelled as one word, refers to time:

He doesn't live here anymore. (In British English it is often spelled any more even in this sense.)

Cheers
CB
Cool Breeze
Koto"...............you will not get anymore of our emails if you go here........"
Hi Koto

I would prefer:
You will not get any more of our emails... because of the of. Anymore, spelled as one word, refers to time:

He doesn't live here anymore. (In British English it is often spelled any more even in this sense.)

Cheers
CB

Hi CB,
Thanks:)
I just copied and pasted the sentence.
I'm not sure but I guess "anymore of " is American and "any more of" is more like British?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more