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Ap Style says that "$2 million- to $5 million-a-year contract" is correctly written. That being said and following their logic with this, do you agree with the below examples? No suggested recasts, please.

Please answer all 4 individually.

a $5,000- to $10,000-a-year raise

a 5 cent- to 15 cent-a-week increase

a 5 to 15 cent-a-week increase

a $5- to $10-a-week increase

Thanks.
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CliveLet me just say that all these examples seem pretty unnatural to me.
Me, too.
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homerfarmsbyAp Style says that "$2 million- to $5 million-a-year contract" is correctly written. That being said and following their logic with this, do you agree with the below examples? No suggested recasts, please.Please answer all 4 individually.

a $5,000- to $10,000-a-year raise - yes

a 5 cent- to 15 cent-a-week increase - no. a 5- to 15-cent-a-week increase (seriously? 15 cents a week? who would notice?)

a 5 to 15 cent-a-week increase - no. you need they hyphen after both 5 and 15

a $5- to $10-a-week increase - yes

Thanks.

It's called the suspended hyphen.

No- to low-cost solutions, available to half- and full-time students, etc.

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Hi,

Let me just say that all these examples seem pretty unnatural to me.

However, I'm not familiar with AP style.

Clive
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Hi,

That part doesn't bother me too much.

It's the plethora of other hyphens.

ie cent-a-week, and to some extent $$-a-year, $$-a-week.

Once again, I don't know AP. But I'd favour rewriting, were I allowed to do so, which I'm not. Emotion: crying



Clive

Me too. An increase of X per Y.