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Are these correct and what's the difference in meaing between them?

1. The gravy guns’ position is changed.
2. The gravy guns’ positions are changed.

3. The gravy gun’s position is changed.
4. The gravy guns’ position is changed

5. These are Jacks’ cars. (Yes, I am saying more then one Jack)
6. This is Jacks’ car.

7. This is someone else’s car.
8. This is someone elses’ car. (Should this be, "These are someone elses' car"?)
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Comments  
1. The gravy guns’ position is changed. two or more guns, one position.
2. The gravy guns’ positions are changed. two or more guns and positions.

3. The gravy gun’s position is changed. one gun, one position.
4. The gravy guns’ position is changed. two or more guns, one position (= S1).

5. These are Jacks’ cars. (Yes, I am saying more then one Jack) No, you're not-- you are writing that his/her name is 'Jacks'. One Jacks, two or more cars.
6. This is Jacks’ car. One Jacks, one car.

7. This is someone else’s car. one other person, one car.
8. This is someone elses’ car. (Should this be, "These are someone elses' car"?) Not a recognized form. SB "some other people's" for example, although actually 'someone else's is used for multiple possibilities.
Thanks
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Are these correct? If not, why?

1. The wraith's gun is so weak.
2. The wraith gun is so weak.

3. Jack's gun is so weak.
4. Jack gun is so weak. (For people, you have to use 'apostrophe s' right? So this should be 'Jack's gun'?)
Hi Jack,

(1) is right because a wraith is humanoid. The same, as you said, for Jack in (2). The rule about 's for only people gets a little grey with animals and other vaguely animate or personified things. While it is definitely 'the table leg is broken', 'my car's left front tire is flat' is perfectly normal.

'1. The wraith's gun is so weak.
3. Jack's gun is so weak.'

So these are the right sentences, except for the 'so's, which should be 'very's for good writing style, in spite of the fact that we say them this way casually.
Thanks.
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What does this mean?
I was planning on buying a Honda Accord, but im starting to like the Mazda's. (What does 'Mazda's' mean? Why is there an apostrophe -s?)
It's a typo, Jack, unless the sentence actually continues, reading something like 'I'm starting to like Mazda's rotary engine'. If the sentence ends as in your example, then it should be 'Mazdas'.
Thanks.

Are these correct? If not, can you correct them? Thanks
1. He doesn’t like Mazdas.
2. He doesn’t like Mazda’s.
3. He doesn’t like Mazda’s cars.
4. He doesn’t like Mazda cars.
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