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Where the subjects of this sentence have a last name of "Sosta", which is correct?

"Over the past twelve years, the Sosta’s have developed a reputation as two of the more personable and knowledgeable members of the paintball industry."
or
"Over the past twelve years, the Sostas have developed a reputation as two of the more personable and knowledgeable members of the paintball industry."
or
"Over the past twelve years, the Sostas' have developed a reputation as two of the more personable and knowledgeable members of the paintball industry."
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In this case, you are not talking about possession; you are refering to a whole family, so the last name (or surname) is pluralized without any apostophe. In such a case, the second sentence is the right one.

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Which is correct

Mr. and Mrs. Ye

the Ye's are going to go to dinner? should the apostrophe be used?
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No, you should NOT use the apostrophe to make the plural. The Yes are going to dinner.

If you are afraid will be taken for the word yes, then write Mr. and Mrs. Ye are going go dinner, or The Ye family is going to dinner.
What about if your name ends in an S. My last name is Nuss. Which is correct to show plural - Nuss' or Nusses?
Nusses. The rules for pluralization don't change just because it's a last name. And, as stated above, there is no possession involved, so apostrophes have nothing to do with it.

mess - messes, kiss - kisses, ..., Nuss - Nusses

CJ
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I've looked all over for a definitive answer for names ending with an i.

The Martinis are coming to dinner.

The Sevieris are here now.

I seems adding only an 's' changes the pronunictiation of the name so it always 'feels' like I should add an apostrophe somehwere.

Additionally, how would you make these names possessive and plural possesive?
That is the Martinis' car ; That is Mr Martini's car

Today is the Servieris' wedding anniversary ; Today is Mrs Servieri's birthday

The apostrophe is only used to indicate possession. It has nothing to do with pluralization.
The same way you would anything else.

This is Steve Martini's car.

This is the Martinis' house.

The Martinis are coming for dinner - no possessive, so no '
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