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Hi,

I think a normal premise behind making of a countable noun out of an uncountable noun is to make or distinguish into types. Can it be applied to proper nouns?

She found a way to help little Bobby.

Here, little isn't good enough to make Bobby into types, but this might do:

She found a cool Bobby sauntering along the road.

Here, cool might makes it cool enough to makes Bobby to wear many different personal hats.

So, can we say for a proper noun like names, the nature of adjective can make a difference in making the name countable or uncountable? Can this only apply to names? How about other proper nouns?

Thank you.
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I wouldn't say "Bobby" is uncountable in your first sentence... To me, "little Bobby" is used as a proper name, as in "young David", "big John"... He *is* little, most probably because there's a tall or older Bobby in his family or in the neighborhood.
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Hi,

I think a normal premise behind making of a countable noun out of an uncountable noun is to make or distinguish into types. Can it be applied to proper nouns?

She found a way to help little Bobby.

Here, little isn't good enough to make Bobby into types, but this might do:

She found a cool Bobby sauntering along the road.

Here, cool might makes it cool enough to makes Bobby to wear many different personal hats.

Yes, I think you are starting to get a good grasp of this.Emotion: smile

So, can we say for a proper noun like names, the nature of adjective can make a difference in making the name countable or uncountable? Maybe. And maybe it depends on the noun, too. I think it's a bit dangerous to generalize like this.

Can this only apply to names? How about other proper nouns? Hard to generalize.

Best wishes, Clive