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(Home to the finest bird sanctuary in Asia and the rare Indian tiger), Rajasthan offers a lot of cultural, historical and nature experiences within a relatively small area.

Hi, The fact that you can leave out one of the appositives in a sentence, and employ its counterpart as the subject of the sentence, it doesn't apply to the sentence above. What is the bracketed part, an appositive?
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The fact that you can leave out one of the appositives in a sentence and employ its counterpart as the subject of the sentence
I'm not so sure that that is really a fact!

I would call the bracketed part an appositive, yes.

CJ
Hi,

I'd like to make a small comment that the use of brackets here seems a little odd and awkward to me.

Clive
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Hi, Clive,

Why is that? What is odd about the use of the brackets? Though, you may not know , originally there wasn't any bracket in that sentence until I added them to point out that part of the sentence. If yet you see any other oddness ,I'd like to hear it.
I agree with Clive. "A home to the birds" and "a sanctuary for the birds" are nice but "home to the birds sanctuary" is wrong.

paco
It's "home to the finest bird sanctuary", where "home to" means "location of", so it's OK! This expression is common with superlatives, as shown below.

Home to the world's biggest stadium, city-X is ...
Home to the largest mall in the U.S., city-Y is ...
Home to the tallest skyscraper, city-Z is ...


CJ
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Hi CJ

I see! I didn't know that kind of collocation. By the way which one did you mean in the reply to K.O. that "home" is appositive to "sanctuary" or that "home" is appositive to "Rajasthan"? And is "home to .. sanctuary" a noun phrase or an adjectival phrase? To me, it sounds like an adjectival. I mean the sentence is the one made by the deletion of "being" from "Being home to the finest bird sanctuary in Asia and the rare Indian tiger, Rajasthan offers a lot of cultural, historical and nature experiences within a relatively small area".

paco

[PS] "Home to the finest bird sanctuary in Asia and the rare Indian tiger" still sounds weird because of the phrase "the rare Indian tiger". I cannot get how it is related to other words in the phrase. Should we take it as "home to the rare Indian tiger"? If it is so, we should understand "home to" here is used as a syllepsis.
Hi KO,

Generally speaking, I'd say that brackets (parentheses in AmE) are not used a lot in formal writing. The oddness in your example is due to the fact that one phrase in apposition has brackets. They just don't work with appositives.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive,
I think KO has been trying to tell us that the sentence does not have any brackets in it.
The only reason he put them there was to point out which part of the sentence he was referring to when he asked if it was an appositive. This is much the same as underlining or using italics to call attention to some aspect of a sentence, even though the original sentence had no underlining or italics in it. Emotion: smile
CJ
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