1. Are we there yet?
2. Aren't we there yet?

Aren't they interchangeable,
depending on the context involving the tone of speech?

TIA
CK
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1. Are we there yet? 2. Aren't we there yet? Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech?

Yes, I would say that they normally are interchangeable..

Strangely, if you aren't there yet, the answer is usually "No" in both cases.!

Ian
1. Are we there yet?

This is a simple question.
2. Aren't we there yet?

This implies regret that the answer is likely to be "no". Indeed, this will usually be said when the questioner knows that the answer is "no", so it's not really a question at all.
Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech? TIA CK

athel
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Moreover, it carries a clear suggestion of irritation, a sense that the trip is taking too long.

Cordially,
Eric Walker, Owlcroft House
http://owlcroft.com/english /
1. Are we there yet?

Anyone know why English has "yet" in this phrase?
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/yet
doesn't seem to have a ready meaning for this case : all are ~"still", none ~"already".
And other languages indeed use the word for "already" here. The phrase as is looks (to me non-Englisher, that is :-) like "Are we still there?".
2. Aren't we there yet? Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech?

guido
http://home.scarlet.be/~pin12499
1. Are we there yet? 2. Aren't we there yet? Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech? TIA

Ask yourself why you said "Aren't they ..." and not "Are they ...," and you may have some of the answer.
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1. Are we there yet? 2. Aren't we there yet? Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech? TIA

Ask yourself why you said "Aren't they ..." and not "Are they ...," and you may have some of the answer.

Good comment. Why didn't I think of that?

athel
1. Are we there yet?

Anyone know why English has "yet" in this phrase? doesn't seem to have a ready meaning for this case : all are ~"still", none ~"already". And other languages indeed use the word for "already" here.

But this would mean something different, I think, since you can say both in English, although I can't pinpoint the difference.
The phrase as is looks (to me non-Englisher, that is :-) like "Are we still there?".

And maybe to some American English speakers too. I've recently been puzzled by one of our local radio announcers who says

"Yet to come, a story about global warming"
Which for me has to be "still to come".
Can others say this (or find it odd as I do)?
Alan
1. Are we there yet?

Anyone know why English has "yet" in this phrase? doesn't seem to have a ready meaning for this case : all are ~"still", none ~"already".

"At this or that time". It doesn't have the same meaning that "already" would have. "Are we there yet?" implies the suspicion that "we" may not yet be there, along with a note of impatience. "Are we there already?" is a rhetorical question indicating that "we are there" is established and expressing surprise that it didn't take longer to arrive.
And other languages indeed use the word for "already" here. The phrase as is looks (to me non-Englisher, that is :-) like "Are we still there?".

2. Aren't we there yet? Aren't they interchangeable, depending on the context involving the tone of speech?

"Aren't we there yet?" implies that the speakers not just a suspicion* that "we" haven't arrive yet but the *assumption that "we" haven't, along with a note of not only impatience but also surprise that "we" haven't.
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