Would you agree with this quote?
QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm
As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining cats and dogs (it's raining very heavily), which many learners encounter early on in their exposure to English. What they don't learn, however, is that the expression seems to have disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression.
UNQUOTE

Enrico C ~ No native speaker
1 2
Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

I have no reason to doubt the writer's experience or his truthfulness in reporting it. On the other hand, "raining cats and dogs" has been a common expression in my experience. That experience is largely limited to the United States in an area bounded by Houston, Chicago, Boston, and Ft. Myers.

Martin Ambuhl
Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

I can't speak to its use by non-native-speakers, but thinking about it, I think the comment about frequency of use is correct. (It's not really in common use anymore or, at least, I've not heard it used unselfconsciously for many years.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
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Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

I blame the animal rights people. Back when I was growing up ... (diatribe snipped) ...

Good luck and good sailing.
s/v Kerry Deare of Barnegat
http://kerrydeare.tripod.com
Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an ... hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

I have no reason to doubt the writer's experience or his truthfulness in reporting it. On the other hand, "raining ... experience. That experience is largely limited to the United States in an area bounded by Houston, Chicago, Boston, and Ft.Myers.

I still use it on occasion (born and raised in Central Illinois). However, every time I do so I am conscious that I am using an idiom, likely because "raining cats and dogs" is typically used as a canonical example when the subject of idioms is being discussed.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
True.
But just think if they tried saying "Boy is it raining! It's coming down like a house afire!" or even "It's raining to beat the band."
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Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

Does that make me a non-native speaker?
Actually, I don't recall having heard my children use it after the age of about 10 or 12 the age when peer pressure replaces clarity of thought and expression. I'd guess that the writer simply doesn't interact with native speakers of English older than their mid-40s.
There is also a change in Americans' way of life. Since the daily exercise of most Americans seems to consist of walking from the house to the car and driving to work or school, then to three other places, and the extent of walking is from the car to the door, rain doesn't make a big difference in most people's lives. Torrential downpours are no longer a big deal, so there's no need to comment on them. Raincoat sales are also way down. And how many kids these days even know what a Mackinaw is?

Jon Miller
Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression. UNQUOTE

I'm a Brit, and I'd say that it's being rested due to overfamiliarity; I expect it'll be rediscovered in a few years' time.

But you'll still often encounter it in a reduced form:

"What's it doing outside at the moment?"
"Cats and dogs, I'm afraid."
Matti
Would you agree with this quote? QUOTE http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/idioms.htm As an example of what I mean, consider the idiom It's raining ... have disappeared from everyday language. In fact, I don't recall ever hearing anyone except a non-native speaker use the expression.

They still rain,
when you anger the Wizard of Id,
Jan
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