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Hello all! I'd like to know whether the sentences below are correct.

1-)Death Note is the only anime that I've spent my whole day watching its all episodes.

2-)Dead Poets Society is the only movie that made me cry whilst making me think.

I also made 2 sentences which are alternative to the ones in above. ( Is this sentence correct as well)

1-) Death note is the only anime which I spent my whole day watch its all episodes.

2-) Dead Poets Society is the only movie which made me cry whilst make me think.

Oh again, I wonder if the subject " Are the following entences correct in terms of grammar? " is correct.

Thanks a lot!
Comments  
NugsoI wonder if the subject " Are the following sentences correct in terms of grammar? " is correct.
Yes, but I would write, "Are the following sentences grammatically correct?"
Nugso1-)Death Note is the only anime that I've spent my whole day watching its all episodes.
It's understandable, but not grammatically correct. You can't have a relative clause (that I've spent ... episodes) that contains a pronoun that represents the noun that the clause modifies — 'its' in this case. And 'its all (episodes)' is not a permissible combination in English. At the very least you need 'all of its (episodes)' except that this version also contains 'its', which you can't have.

Very formally, Death Note is the only anime all of whose episodes I've spent my whole day watching. (Not recommended.)
Informally, Death Note is the only anime that I've spent my whole day watching all (the) episodes of. (Not great either, but better.)
Nugso2-)Dead Poets Society is the only movie that made me cry whilst making me think.
OK. whilst is BrE. I use while (AmE). Substituting which for that is fine.

CJ
Hello and thank you CalifJim.
CalifJimIt's understandable, but not grammatically correct. You can't have a relative clause (that I've spent ... episodes) that contains a pronoun that represents the noun that the clause modifies — 'its' in this case. And 'its all (episodes)' is not a permissible combination in English. At the very least you need 'all of its (episodes)' except that this version also contains 'its', which you can't have.
I'm dumbfounded once again. Could you please explain it more? I sometimes or maybe usually hard time understanding those kinds of things. Emotion: crying
CalifJimVery formally, Death Note is the only anime all of whose episodes I've spent my whole day watching. (Not recommended.)Informally, Death Note is the only anime that I've spent my whole day watching all (the) episodes of. (Not great either, but better.)
What would you write if you were me?
CalifJimOK. whilst is BrE. I use while (AmE). Substituting which for that is fine.
I thought the former one is more formal thus I decided to use. I've just learnt more thing!
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NugsoYou can't have a relative clause (that I've spent ... episodes) that contains a pronoun that represents the noun that the clause modifies.
OK. You're probably going to have to help me here. I don't know exactly what you need to have explained. Do you not know what a relative clause is? Or is the word 'pronoun' giving you trouble?

Here's the sort of thing that is wrong:

a man that I met him yesterday
the book that you gave it to me
the children that I met their parents
a TV series that I watched its episodes

CJ
NugsoWhat would you write if you were me?
I've spent my whole day watching all the episodes of Death Note, but that's the only anime I have ever done that for.

I don't usually spend my whole day watching all the episodes of an anime, but I did for Death Note.

I have never spent my whole day watching all the episodes of an anime, but I made an exception for Death Note.

I have never spent a whole day watching all the episodes of an anime — except for Death Note.

CJ
Yes, that was what I meant. In those examples, him/it/their/its looks incorrect without any doubt( to me). But in the sentence I've written for some reason I did not see the its-that thing. You've explained it very well, thanks!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Aha, thank you once again! Somehow the latter and the former one are the sentences I'd choose!