I have read some lengthy posts giving very complicated explanations of usage, which don't always make a whole lot of sense. Isn't language primarily about communication. You say it; I understand it. Wasn't grammar an invention for non-native speakers of Ancient Greek? I assert the subjunctive is a construct and doesn't exist in English. Shoot me down in flames.
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I might have agreed, were I to have thought as you, but might I remark, there may the chance such moods might have existed once and may do again.
Hello Xavier,

you're right of course: Communication is one of the tasks of language.
The Grammar is "late": Language follows special patterns (word order, inflection, cases, conjugation, etc) - language has to follow those patterns as without them, communication wouldn't be possible.
The only reason why you understand what I say is: you know the language-structure.
This structure works without any problems for your native language. For languages that you learn(ed) later, you need to know its structure to a certain level ---> GRAMMARS "filter out" these structures , show you HOW components are set together and how the whole complex works.

Grammar therefore is necessary for anyone who learns a foreign language but also for those who want to know how their native language works. It is very helpful to know about the Grammar of your native language, too, as comparing special aspects can show you where difficulties are.

As Ancient Greek grammars (and also Latin grammars later on) had a huge influence also on Germanic languages like English, they also took over some grammatic features that haven't existed originally in Germanic languages.
You mentioned the tenses e.g.:
Germanic languages originally had TWO tenses only,
The PAST-Tense and the NON-PAST-Tense
(= today's Simple Past and Simple Present tense)

Everything could be expressed with these two tenses as the simple Present wasn't and still isn't only used for events that take place in the actual present, but also for general facts and truths (=It SNOWS a lot in Sweden), for events that happen in the future (=The train LEAVES at 4 o'clock), etc.

Beside the indicative mood, the Germanic languages also have a conjunctive (also: subjunctive) mood which describes events and happenings as irreal.

All other tenses and also the conditional-mood have been constructed and base on Greek and Latin Grammars (e.g. the Perfect tenses and the Future tenses). That is btw why these tenses have to be paraphrased in English by a helping verb and the participle or infinitive of the main verb, while the original Past and Present tenses consist of the conjugated full verb only.

So you're correct that the traditional Grammar originally came over from Greece, but no matter what language you learn, you need to know about its structure - and this structure is explained in Grammars.

I hope I could help you a bit.

Cheers
-Pemmican
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I agree. I learned English grammar as a child, and it did help. Of course, for it to be useful, I have to read and read until I "get" the structure of the language.
no, they are not, if you really want to speak, look at a child how long does it take to acquire your mother tongue, does it ask grammatical questions..????????? that is the first clue

secondly, it depends on the language, german has many rules, therefore easier to put the rules into prqctise, but you must not co;pqre lqnguqges, for ex; english has not set rules, so there fore impossible to abide by them so if you really want to learn renglish, don,t put up too many barriers, just go and understand later good luck
no, they are not, if you really want to speak, look at a child how long does it take to acquire your mother tongue, does it ask grammatical questions..????????? that is the first clue

secondly, it depends on the language, german has many rules, therefore easier to put the rules into prqctise, but you must not co;pqre lqnguqges, for ex; english has not set rules, so there fore impossible to abide by them so if you really want to learn renglish, don,t put up too many barriers, just go and understand later good luck
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You know, the rules have been created so that the foreigners can learn Enlish without to be with english people. The rules show the manner of speaking of the english people. They are'nt barriers because they help to understand english people and to be understood from this one.

I'm sure when you're a small child, you should learn the grammar rules of your native tongues. And this enable you to avoid to make mistakes when you're talking.
Well,when you talk of grammar perhaps the only thing that comes to mind are the different rules and their enormous uses. But if you look at this way, that if you don't know the construction of sentences and the structure, you may not understand what the other person is saying.

Take a sentence for example, talk I with you and go will.You understand the meaning but you know that the structure is wrong. It feels odd to hear someone talk this way in English. Whatever be the language you learn,there are some rules that you need to learn so as to not disrespect the native speaker when you try to talk to them.

Just as you need to learn the numbers and digits 1,2,3 etc in order to learn Maths;just as you learn alphabets to learn words,so also you need to learn rules of grammar to learn a language.
I, too, think that grammar is really important, for both foreigners and native speakers. For me it would have been impossible to learn english properly if it had not been for the grammar I have been learning at school. Since I do not have the possibility to listen to native speakers every day learning grammar is the only possibility to get a grip on the english language.

But grammar is important to me as a german as well, because if we did not have grammar everyone would talk as he feels like and it could be quite hard to understand other people sometimes.
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