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"Kiss whom goodbye. It is rarely heard in conversation now, and just about never in clause-initial position."
G K Pullum


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Did you have some sort of question about this?
False. I use it pretty often, for example:

Whom I'd of done such a thing?
Whom est up my room? What a mess!
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AnonymousKiss whom goodbye. It is rarely heard in conversation now
Certainly it's an unusual collocation. But perhaps:


Middle-aged mother to son, deciding to come clean at last, as "Uncle" Frank prepares to depart:

"Aren't you going to kiss your father goodbye, darling?"

Son:

"Kiss whom goodbye?"

MrP

I am ready to kiss it goodbye in some situations. I would never say: "Whom did you meet?", but I do use it after prepositions, though I am probably more likely to use the inverted form e.g. "Who by?"

Anyway, I don't think G K Pullum should be laying down the law on the matter. Let those who want to carry on using it do so.
Grammar GeekDid you have some sort of question about this?

See the thread title.
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KooyeenFalse. I use it pretty often, for example:

Whom I'd of done such a thing?
Whom est up my room? What a mess!


You've sense of whomer!
ForbesAnyway, I don't think G K Pullum should be laying down the law on the matter. Let those who want to carry on using it do so.

Yeah. They'll become oddities. Why not let 'em go that way if they want to?
Anonymous They'll become oddities.
I'm reminded of an episode at another forum .

MrP
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