The underlined words in a are a dangling modifier/participle.

b is a dangling modifier too.

But why is it a modifier? Are reduced adverbial clauses no longer adverbial in nature like unreduced adverbial clauses? Are they now adjectival, and modifying the subject, as in sentence b?

a. Having finished the assignment, the TV set was turned on

b. I love meat. If cooked properly, i could eat a tonne of it.

Cheers
English 1b3The underlined words in a are a dangling modifier/participle.

b is a dangling modifier too.

But why is it a modifier? Are reduced adverbial clauses no longer adverbial in nature like unreduced adverbial clauses? Are they now adjectival, and modifying the subject, as in sentence b?

a. Having finished the assignment, the TV set was turned on
b. I love meat. If cooked properly, i could eat a tonne of it.

Cheers
See this reference for an explanation.

Clauses, phrases or reduced clauses can certainly be adjectival. They describe or llimit a noun.

The dog barking in the garden kept the neighbors awake.

The dog that was barking in the garden kept the neighbors awake.

The underlined (reduced) clauses certainly limit the noun dog. It is not adverbial.

In your (b)

b. I love meat. If cooked properly, I could eat a tonne of it.

The underlined phrase certainly refers to the meat; I don't think I need to be cooked properly to be able to enjoy eating meat! Corrected:

b. I love meat. If it is cooked properly, I could eat a tonne of it.
What I'm saying is that there seems to be a difference between an adverbial clause, which functions as an adverb, while a reduced adverbial clause seems to function adjectivally, and that is why we need to change 'if cooked properly', which modifies the noun, to 'if it is cooked properly' which modifies the entire main clause, so that we don't have a dangling modifier...

Does that make sense?
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Did you click on the reference link in the previous post?

It explains things better than I can. You will observe that these are adjectival phrases / clauses because they limit, modify, or describe a noun.

If you have more questions after reading it, please reply again

Regards,

A-Emotion: stars