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  1. You are crazy, thinking that you should lend money to him!

  2. You are crazy, planning to travel around the Earth just in a month!

  3. You are crazy that you said so to your teacher!

  4. You are crazy, behaving that rudely in front of your teacher!

  5. You are insane, thinking of fighting me!

  6. You are insane to fight me!

  7. You are out of your mind to drive from Florida to New York in one day!

Q1) Are these bold parts used as backgrounds for speakers to give opinions of "you" ?

Q2) Are those sentences all natural and grammatically correct?

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Q1 Yes, you can think of it that way.

Q2 Yes

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1) You are [crazy / insane] to [think / plan / drive / ...] ...
2) You are [crazy / insane] [thinking / planning / driving / ...] ...
3) You are [crazy / insane] that ...

1a) It is [crazy / insane] to ...
2a) It is [crazy / insane] thinking ...
3a) It is [crazy / insane] that ...

Of the first three, 1) is probably most used, then 2).
Of course, you may substitute "He is", "She is", and so on for "You are".
3) is impossible.

Of the last three, all are possible.

CJ

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Comments  

To CalifJim

Thank you very much.

Could you help me once again?

I wonder whether 1 2 3 sound natural and the interpretations a1 a2 a3 for 1 2 3 are correct.


1. You're crazy to tell my girlfriend I cheated on her!

a1.It's crazy that you're going to tell my girlfriend I cheated on her!


2. You're crazy to divorce your husband!

a2.It's crazy that you're going to divorce your husband!


3. You're crazy to quit your job!

a3.It's crazy that you're going to quit your job!

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Yes. Those interpretations are correct. Note below that the interpretations marked "c" are much less likely than those marked "a", but they are also possible. Or, to say it more precisely, you can say such things after the event has already occurred, but it's not often done. After the event it's much more likely to use "were": You were crazy to tell ..., and so on.

Examples marked "b" are alternate ways of saying those marked "a". It's just a different grammatical pattern. The meanings are the same.

Examples marked "d" are alternate ways of saying those marked "c". Again, it's different grammar but the same meaning.

1. You're crazy to tell my girlfriend I cheated on her!

a1. It's crazy that you're going to tell my girlfriend I cheated on her!
b1. It's crazy for you to tell my girlfriend I cheated on her!
c1. It's crazy that you have told my girlfriend I cheated on her!
d1. It's crazy for you to have told my girlfriend I cheated on her!


2. You're crazy to divorce your husband!

a2. It's crazy that you're going to divorce your husband!
b2. It's crazy for you to divorce your husband!
c2. It's crazy that you have divorced your husband!
d2. It's crazy for you to have divorced your husband!


3. You're crazy to quit your job!

a3. It's crazy that you're going to quit your job!
b3. It's crazy for you to quit your job!
c3. It's crazy that you have quit your job!
d3. It's crazy for you to have quit your job!

CJ

CalifJim

c2. It's crazy that you have divorced your husband!

Hi, CaliJim! Are you enjoying your weekend ? Emotion: smile

It's not a big question. I'm curious about whether I can simply say "It's crazy that you divorced your husband!" instead of "It's crazy that you have divorced your husband!".

Does the past tense work in this context as well?

fire1I'm curious about whether I can simply say "It's crazy that you divorced your husband!" instead of "It's crazy that you have divorced your husband!".

Yes, you can say it either way.

CJ

fire1Does the past tense work in this context as well?

You mean "It was crazy that ..."? Yes, but then you can't use "have divorced" later in the sentence.

It was crazy that you divorced your husband.

CJ

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