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Hi teachers,
Useful Information: Mr. Landon calls Robert on the intercom.
A: Robert, bring me the order book.
B: In a minute Mr. Landon.
A: Robert, I told you to bring me the order book twenty minutes ago and you haven’t brought it yet. What are you doing?
B: Sorry Mr. Landon, I’m looking for it but I can’t find it.

Useful Information: Caroline is talking with her brother on the phone.
A: Robert, you haven't bought anything for our parents’ anniversary yet. What are you thinking? Their anniversary is tomorrow.
B: I know that Caroline. I just don’t know what to buy.

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
What is your question?

(Later). Sorry. I didn't notice that the thread title was the question. Please ask the question in the thread itself.

The answer to your question is that the conversations are correct, but neither is not particularly natural. I'll return with more on that later, unless somebody gets there first.
They look correct to me. The only thing I stumbled on was "What are you thinking?"

Did you intend that as a sort of reprimand, as if to say that Robert is negligent?
Or as "What are you thinking of buying?", i.e., "What do you plan to buy?"

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CalifJimDid you intend that as a sort of reprimand, as if to say that Robert is negligent?
Hi Jim,
Thanks for your reply.
Yes I did! Exactly that. He is quite negligent and lazy.

TS
fivejedjonbut neither is not particularly natural.
Hi fivejedjon,
Thanks for your reply.
Why aren't they?
fivejedjonPlease ask the question in the thread itself.
A teacher asked me to do it that way. S/he said there was no need to repeat that. But, of course, I have no problems in doing it in the way you request.

TS
OK - my first criticism:
Thinking SpainA: Robert, bring me the order book.B: In a minute Mr. Landon.
To me, "in a minute" suggests "You'll have to wait". If B can bring the order book immediately, then a better resoonse is " Yes, Mr Landon". If there is good reason for delay, then this needs to be explained,: "Yes, Mr Landon. I'll bring them as soon as I have found them".

My second criticism:
Thinking Spain Robert, you haven't bought anything for our parents’ anniversary yet.
In my opinion (others may disagree), most sisters would say to their brothers, "... anything for Mum/Mom and Dad's anniversary yet".
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Such dialogues are typically culture-dependent.

I note that Mr. Landon calls Robert 'Robert', but Robert calls Mr. Landon 'Mr Landon'.
In addition, Mr Landon issues his order without saying 'Please'.

This is not typical of the Canadian workplace, at least in my experience.

Clive
Hi fivejedjon and Clive,
Thank you very much for your contributions.Emotion: smile

TS