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Hi teachers,
Context:
One day a new nurse came to the hospital, and nobody told her about Merrick. She took his food to his room, and opened the door. Then she saw him. She screamed, dropped the food on the floor, and ran out of the room.

Are these good questions and answers for the text?
1. What happened one day? A new nurse arrived at the hopital.
(Is it correct to use 'arrived at'? I can't use 'came to', can I?)
2. Did anybody inform the nurse of Merrick? No. Nobody did. (Is it 'informed of'?)
3. How come the nurse saw Merrick? Because she took his food to his room, and opened the door.
4. What was the nurse's reaction when she saw Merrick? She screamed, dropped the food on the floor, and ran out of the room.

Thanks in advance.
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Thinking Spain1. What happened one day? A new nurse arrived at the hopital.(Is it correct to use 'arrived at'? I can't use 'came to', can I?)
You can say "arrived at" or "came to". The text says she "came to the hospital".
Thinking Spain2. Did anybody inform the nurse of Merrick? No. Nobody did. (Is it 'informed of'?)
From Collins Dictionary: inform (verb) tr; often foll by of or about to give information to; tell

"Of" sounds too formal to me. I suggest: "Did anybody inform the nurse about Merrick?"

3 & 4 seem fine to me. Emotion: smile

P.S. This is such a sad story! Emotion: crying
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi Shawn,
Thank you for your corrections and help.
I think I got it. Both "arrive" and "come" can be used to express the idea of reaching a destination. Right?
P.S. This is such a sad story!
Don't worry, the story makes a switch! Emotion: nodding
Thinking SpainBoth "arrive" and "come" can be used to express the idea of reaching a destination. Right?
My dictionary lists these as synonyms, especially in the past tense where the end result of coming and arriving is the same. Emotion: wink