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Hi teachers,
This is for a listening comprehension exercise. The text is from a CD. (The Elephant Man)
Context:
Merrick read about women in his books, but he did not often talk to women. He met the nurses every day, but they did not talk to him very much. For them, he was always a creature, not a man.

Are these two equally correct?
1a. Did Merrick usually have conversations to women? No, he didn’t.
1b. Did Merrick usually start a conversation to women? No, he didn’t.
Would these two be equally correct?
2a. Who did Merrick come together daily with? He came together with the nurses.
2b. Who did Merrick come to daily? He came together with the nurses.

3. Why didn’t the nurses start a conversation with Merrick? Because for them Merrick was always a creature, not a man.

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Thinking SpainAre these two equally correct?
They're both wrong because of the preposition to. Also, usually is not synonymous with often, so it hardly seems appropriate. Start isn't a good idea, either: The context says nothing about initiating conversations.

Did Merrick often have conversations with women? No, he didn't.
Did Merrick often talk to women? No, he didn't.
Thinking SpainWould these two be equally correct?
Neither come to nor come together seem to fit here. They sound very awkward.

Who did Merrick meet daily? He met the nurses daily.

Why didn't the nurses talk to Merrick very often? Because For them, Merrick was always a creature, not a man.
Aspara GusAlso, usually is not synonymous with often.
Hi Aspara Gus,
Thank you for your reply. My questions turned out to be a total disaster.
But these are synonyms, aren't they?
Often = frequently, many times. Usually = generally.
Aspara Gus Why didn't the nurses talk to Merrick very often? Because For them, Merrick was always a creature, not a man.
What is the reason not to use 'because' in the answer?

TS
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Thinking SpainUsually = generally at most times, under normal conditions
No, I don't consider often and usual synonyms.
Thinking SpainWhat is the reason not to use 'because' in the answer?
There is no need to answer a question with because. It's redundant and makes the answer a fragment, i.e., not a sentence. Native speakers do it all the time, nevertheless.
Aspara GusThere is no need to answer a question with because. It's redundant and makes the answer a fragment, i.e., not a sentence. Native speakers do it all the time, nevertheless.
Hi Aspara Gus,
Thank you for your reply.
This one will be the same case then. There is no need to use because in the answer. Without because it is a sentence not a fragment.
How do you now?
(Because) the doctor said (that) he hadn’t wanted Merrick to live by himself.

TS
Thinking SpainHow do you know?
Because makes the clause dependent on a main clause. The word that does not subordinate the clause, if I understood your confusion correctly.

Because the doctor said that he didn't want Merrick to live by himself, Merrick got himself a roommate.
The doctor said that he didn't want Merrick to live by himself.
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Aspara GusBecause the doctor said that he didn't want Merrick to live by himself, Merrick got himself a roommate.The doctor said that he didn't want Merrick to live by himself.
Hi AG,
Thank you for your reply. Great example! It's crystal clear.Emotion: smile

TS