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Is the following sentence correctly punctuated? Or should I use a period after 'dirtball'?

But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says: “He is a dirtball,” and later adding, “I hate him so much!”

How about: But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says: "He is a dirtball" and "I hate him so much!"
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Hi,

Is the following sentence correctly punctuated? Or should I use a period after 'dirtball'?

But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says: “He is a dirtball,” and later adding, “I hate him so much!”


I'd say But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says “He is a dirtball”, and later adds “I hate him so much!”

How about: But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says: "He is a dirtball" and "I hate him so much!"


I'd say But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says "He is a dirtball" and "I hate him so much!"

Best wishes, Clive
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ThecandymancanIs the following sentence correctly punctuated? Or should I use a period after 'dirtball'?

But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says “He is a dirtball” and later adding, “I hate him so much!”

...dirtball", later adding... OR ...dirtball" and later adds ...

How about: But her hate for her father becomes unmistakable when she says "He is a dirtball" and "I hate him so much!" This one is fine

"hatred" is better than "hate" in this context.

[Sorry, Clive - I didn't see you there!]
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Comments  
It's interesting to see that you people don't think I should use a comma (or colon) before 'says'. I have noticed that most authors use a comma after a form of said. Maybe this is only an American thing?
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If it dialogue, I would insert a comma after says, but where, as in your example, it is quoting what someone says, I would omit it.