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If a blood vessel in the brain is ruptured, you can say "S/he's bleeding in her/his brain."
In this example, the preposition "in" is used, but you can also say "S/he's bleeding into her/his brain.", am I right?
The question is if these two expressions have exactly the same meaning.

I thought "into" suggests a sort of a movement like "from outside to inside, inward", and "in" implies "a state of being inside of something" in addition to "inward".
So I figured there may be some differences.
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I'd say you can't. Into shows direction, as you've already observed.

"S/he's bleeding into her/his brain."

doesn't quite make sense.
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bleeding in the brain is telling us where the bleeding activity is taking place.
bleeding into the brain is telling us where the blood is going.

I seem to recall that there is a "blood-brain" barrier that must not be crossed. If the blood is not confined to its vessels in the brain and "bleeds into the brain", horrible consequences can occur. (I'm not a doctor, so verify with an authority on the subject!)

CJ
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Marius HancuI'd say you can't. Into shows direction, as you've already observed.

"S/he's bleeding into her/his brain."

doesn't quite make sense.
Well, I've heard both expressions using IN and INTO, so ...
Thanks, anyway.
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CalifJimbleeding in the brain is telling us where the bleeding activity is taking place.
bleeding into the brain is telling us where the blood is going.

I seem to recall that there is a "blood-brain" barrier that must not be crossed. If the blood is not confined to its vessels in the brain and "bleeds into the brain", horrible consequences can occur. (I'm not a doctor, so verify with an authority on the subject!)

CJ

Right. So, if you say someone is bleeding into, for example, the chest,
the bleeding is not necessarily occuring in the chest. It could be somewhere else.

Thank you!