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1. I ̩don't knowˈ how to solve it.

2. I had been ˌspeaking Engˈlish ˌall dayˈ and I ˌdon't feelˈ like my ˌspoken Engˈlish is improved because noˈ oneˌ would ˌever ˈcorrect mistakesˈ for ˌme.

3. You ˌsound likeˈ me (falling intonation)

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Please explain your notation. Stress symbols ˈ (primary) and ˌ (secondary) and are normally placed before the stressed syllable, yet you often put them at the ends of words. Also, what (if any) difference is there between what you are trying to show with stress symbols and what you are trying to show with bold text?

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mosjaˈcorrect

This should be cor'rect.

CJ

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Comments  

The bold texts are stressed.

So what do the symbols ˈ and ˌ mean?

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ˈ first stress ˌ secondary stress.

1. I don't know how to solve it.

2. I had been speaking English all day and I don't feel like my spoken English is improved because no one would ever correct mistakes for me.

3. You sound like me (falling intonation)

mosjaˈ first stress ˌ secondary stress.

As I mentioned, these symbols normally come before the syllable. I don't understand what rule you are using. Sometimes you have a symbol before the start of a word, and sometimes after the end of a word. I can't understand it.

Ignoring these symbols, the bold stresses seem OK, except for "for me" which should not have stress on "me".

I have been speaking English all day, but I don't feel like my spoken English has improved, because no one would ever correct mistakes for me.

(red text is suggested word improvements, not stress)

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CalifJimThis should be cor'rect.

Oh yes, thanks, I missed that.