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Are these sentences appropriate?

1) Instead of "Do you know what is the reason they're leaving?"

Can we use this "Do you know what the reason they're leaving is?"

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2) Instead of What is the reason behind this?"

Can we use this "What the reason behind this is?"

please advise and thanks

Gary
Comments  
1) Instead of "Do you know what is the reason they're leaving?"

Can we use this "Do you know what the reason they're leaving is?"

Neither is correct. You may say, "Do you know what the reason is for their leaving?" or,"Do you know the reason for their leaving?" or, "Do you know why they're leaving?"

2) Can we use this "What the reason behind this is?"

No. But there are other ways of asking, such as, "What is the reason for this?" or, "What is the reasoning behind this?"

I believe you are asking about word order in direct and indirect questions.

Direct question: "What is the reason behind this?"
Indirect question: "Do you know what the reason behind this is?"

There is one word order for the direct form and another word order for the indirect form, and you can't switch them in the general case.

Here are some word groups that normally require the indirect question word order:

Do you know?
I (don't) know; he/she (doesn't) know, we (don't) know, they (don't) know
I can't imagine, I have no idea, I don't understand, I can't guess, ...
That's, That was, ...
I asked, I told you/them/...,

Examples (direct, indirect):

What was it? Do you know what it was? I can't imagine what it was. We had no idea what it was. That's what it was. I asked what it was. They told me what it was.

Who is that man? They don't know who that man is. That's who that man is. You'll never guess who that man is.

CJ
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The question "Do you know what the reason they're leaving is?" might be ambiguous in certain contexts (or without a context, as in the first post in this thread), but it is a grammatically correct construction.

A possible answer to that question may be "Yes, they've just told me. The reason they're leaving is that they start work very early in the morning."

Some would say "the reason why they're leaving", but that's redundant.
Miriammight be ambiguous in certain contexts... but it is a grammatically correct construction.

Miriam, what your post brings to the fore (now that I stand corrected) is a question about the cause of that ambiguity. One can certainly feel confident in knowing how to answer the question as Gary revised it-- I realize you are not using that confidence-in-knowing as proof ot its correctness --so, what kind of context would bring out its ambiguity?
Davkett1) Instead of "Do you know what is the reason they're leaving?"

Can we use this "Do you know what the reason they're leaving is?"

Neither is correct. You may say, "Do you know what the reason is for their leaving?" or,"Do you know the reason for their leaving?" or, "Do you know why they're leaving?"

2) Can we use this "What the reason behind this is?"

No. But there are other ways of asking, such as, "What is the reason for this?" or, "What is the reasoning behind this?"

Hi davkett,

I think that it is also correct to say, "Do you know the reason for they are leaving?"

Do you agree? Emotion: smile


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The-BestI think that it is also correct to say, "Do you know the reason for they are leaving?"

No. But, it's close. In using 'for', you could have--

a) 'Do you know the reason for their leaving?'

b) 'Do you know the reason for them to leave?'

I can think of two ways to change the punctuation of your phrase, and make it correct (though the meaning will be different):

1) "Do you know the reason, for they are leaving?" (If the word you rather than know is stressed, the question, as written, might imply this: 'Since they are leaving, I can't ask them what they know, so I'm asking you.')

2) "Do you know the reason for 'they are leaving'?" (This would be a form you might find on EnglishForward when there is a question about the use of the phrase, 'they are leaving'-- "Do you know the reasoning behind the use of the phrase 'they are leaving'?"