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Are these sentences grammatical? And if not, could you rewrite for me or explain what’s wrong inside? Please : )

After the inauguration, I saw the new elected mayor lying inside his new office in proneness with a dagger pierced through his throat, many people guess that it might be done by his new hired porter.

On my way home I saw 4 porters moved the coronation coach, showing sharp malice from their eyes.

I got into the habit of treating racist with tremendous malice when I once saw a racist stepped over a prone black infant.
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Hi Maserati,

Welcome to the Forum.

After the inauguration, I saw the new elected mayor lying inside his new office, prone with a dagger through his throat. Many people think that it might have been done by his newly hired porter.

On my way home, I saw four porters moving the coronation coach, showing sharp malice in their eyes.

I got into the habit of treating racists with tremendous malice when I once saw a racist step over a prone, black infant. 'Malice' is not the best word. It depends on what you mean. Disgust? Anger?

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveHi Maserati,

Welcome to the Forum.

I saw the new elected mayor

Clive,

Is it "new elected mayor" or "newly elected mayor"? Thanks.
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hi, its new elected mayor, yes

thenk you : )
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Hi guys,

I saw the newly elected mayor You could say it either way. It depends on whether you mean he is new and he is elected, or whether you mean his election was recent. But, I think Krish is probably right, that 'newly elected' sounds more likely.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks for the explanation, Clive.