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Are these sentences correct under the temporal reading of "since"

Tony has been happy since he has visited the Cape.

Tony has been happy since he has been to the Cape.

Tony has been happy since he has gone to the Cape.

I am a student of linguistics from China. I am studying the usage of "since" in clauses and its interaction with Perfect and Imperfective. However, I am not a native speaker, so I'm seeking your helps on grammaticality of these sentences. Any responese will be appreciated, thx a lot!
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Hello, Billy-- and welcome to English Forums. Present perfect occasionally appears in the dependent clause, but here it offers confusion:

Tony has been happy since he has visited / has been to / has gone to the Cape.-- This suggest causal 'since'
Tony has been happy since he visited / was at / went to the Cape.-- This suggests temporal 'since'.
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Thank you for your reply, Mister Micawber!
I am sorry that I haven't stated it clearly in my post. What I am intending to ask is that "Are these sentences correct under the temporal 'since' reading?" That is to say, we should rule out the causal reading of 'since'.
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They are 'correct', but the usage is rare. Most grammarians would correct to the simple past, since they all refer to past events.
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IC. Some more questions. If we can say the 2nd sentence in normal situations, then what does it mean?
I found similar discussions over the issue of since and perfect in the following thread:
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/PresentPerfectSimplePastSince-Clause/gjcrq/post.htm
After reading those replies, I wonder: does the 2nd sentence, "Tony has been happy since he has been to the Cape.", mean that:
before the period in which Tony was happy, he went to the Cape, but when it comes to the period in which Tony was happy, he was back and was not in the Cape any more?
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I haven't the patience to read through that thread, but all those members in the discussion are reasonably perceptive members of our community. It should be obvious to you that the precise meanings often cannot be nailed down without doubt when the statement is out of context.

There should be plenty for you to chew on in that thread, and I don't want to go through all your sentences for possible/probable theoretical interpretations, but as for the sentence you mention:

Tony has been happy since he has been to the Cape = 'Tony went to the cape; from that time until now he has been happy'. That is all we can read from the sentence as it stands.
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