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I just want to be absolutely sure. The following sentences are SIMPLE sentences, right?

  • I moved to Singapore and got a teaching position at a small college.

  • I went back to Malaysia and Japan many times and hope to be able to go back again next summer.
Many thanks.

Donna
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Comments  
Hi Donna,

No. A simple sentence contains one main clause. These are compound sentences.

Best wishes, Clive
I moved to Singapore and (I) got a teaching position at a small college.

I went backto Malaysia and Japan many times and (I) hope to be able to go back again next summer.

Each underlined part is an independent clause and could stand alone as a simple sentence. The ands not underlined are the cordinating cunjunctions that connect the independent clauses. Two or more connected independent clauses like these make compound sentences. The (I)s are not necessary unless you want to break them up and make four simple sentenses.
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Clive, thanks again, for coming to my rescue.

But I seem to remember that there is a certain rule saying a simple sentence can have compound verb (or predicate).

Therefore, I have always thought that:

u I moved to and got a teaching position at a small college.

(simple sentence)

Whereas:

u I moved to , and I got a teaching position at a small college.

(compound sentence joined by a coordinating conjunction and a comma)

Any further comments on this, or maybe I've been mistaken all along?

Hi, Anonymous

Thank you for your explanation. But could you please also comment on my earlier post RE simple sentence can have compound verb?

Donna
Hi again,

But I seem to remember that there is a certain rule saying a simple sentence can have compound verb (or predicate).

Therefore, I have always thought that:

u I moved to Singapore and got a teaching position at a small college.

(simple sentence)

Whereas:

u I moved to Singapore, and I got a teaching position at a small college.

(compound sentence joined by a coordinating conjunction and a comma)

Any further comments on this, or maybe I've been mistaken all along? Yes, you have.Emotion: smileThe choices to use a comma and to omit the 'I' make no difference to the basic sentence structure.

A simple sentence has one main clause. Mary cooked dinner.

A compound sentence has two or more main clauses. Mary cooked dinner and Tom ate it.

A complex sentence includes a subordinate clause. Mary cooked dinner because Tom was hungry.

A compound-complex sentence is Mary cooked dinner and Tom ate it because he was hungry.

Best wishes, Clive
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Ah. I think she is asking whether a statement like "I washed and set my hair" can be simple - two verbs, but still one clause. And then, by extension "I washed my hair in the sink and set it in big rollers."
Hi,

"I washed and set my hair"

In extended form, this is two main clauses. "I washed (my hair) and (I) set my hair".

Best wishes, Clive
I came across this post on simple sentences.

I have a query. Please help.

Birds fly. Birds sing.

How do I combine the above sentences into i)simple and ii)compound sentence?

Bill loves cooking. Tina loves cooking.

How do I combine the above sentences into i)simple and ii)compound sentence?

What I am confused about is how do we combine sentences to make a simple and a compound sentence when the subject in both sentences is same or verb in both sentences is same.
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