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Hello,

Could you correct or confirm these uses of "whose"?


We use whose to ask questions and to introduce relative clauses.

Let's only focus on "whose" to ask questions.


Use #1

We use whose to ask a question about possession. (inanimate objects)

Whose birthday is it today?

Whose house is that?

Whose car did you go to the party?


Use #2

We use whose to ask a question about possession. (pets)

Whose dog was in the car accident?

Whose parrot is in that picture?

Whose cat scratched the sofa?

Use #3

We use whose to ask about family relationships. (Is this one correct? Is that how you name this use?)

Whose mother is he?

Whose son is he?

Whose family isn't coming to the party?

Whose father drove you home?

Whose grandma made the cake?

Whose girlfriend is in London?

Am I correct about the following?

a) This question is incorrect; right?

Whose parents are Peter and Mary? They are Sue's parents.

It should be:

Who are Sue's parents?

b) This question is also incorrect; right?

Whose friend is Mary? She is Peter's friend.

It should be:

Who is Peter's friend? Mary (is).

Who is Mary's friend? Peter (is).

To me:

We use whose to ask a question about possession. (inanimate objects)

We use whose to ask a question about possession. (pets)

But we don't use whose to ask about friendship.

What about family relationships. Do we use whose?

I appreciate your help.

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anonymousCould you correct or confirm these uses of "whose"?

You've got the right idea about all of them.

The only problematic example is Whose mother is he? He can't be anybody's mother because he is not a woman.

It's either Whose father is he? or Whose mother is she?

anonymous

a) This question is incorrect; right?

Whose parents are Peter and Mary? They are Sue's parents.

It should be:

Who are Sue's parents?

b) This question is also incorrect; right?

Whose friend is Mary? She is Peter's friend.

It should be:

Who is Peter's friend? Mary (is).

Who is Mary's friend? Peter (is).

Correct.

anonymousWhat about family relationships. Do we use whose?

You already have good examples of those (except the one mentioned above), so yes, we use 'whose' for family relationships.

CJ

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Thanks a lot, CalifJim!

You've got the right idea about all of them.

The only problematic example is Whose mother is he?

He can't be anybody's mother because he is not a woman.

Isn't it better in this case to use "who" instead of "whose"? What about these ones:

1. Who is his mother?" Laura (is).

2. Who is Peter's mother? Laura (is).


Then, we never use "whose" for friendship, instead we always use "who". Correct?


So yes, we use 'whose' for family relationships.

Whose parents are Peter and Molly? They are Carla and Ruben's.

In the question above, I understand that "Peter" and "Molly" are the parents, and "Carla" and Ruben" are the children. Is that so?

anonymous

Isn't it better in this case to use "who" instead of "whose"? What about these ones:

1. Who is his mother?" Laura (is).

2. Who is Peter's mother? Laura (is).

You can do these several ways, but the ones with "who" are better.

Whose son is he? Laura's. <<< Note how the answer is possessive here.
Whose mother is Peter's? Laura. <<< This one is especially awkward.
Who is his mother? Laura.

CJ

anonymousThen, we never use "whose" for friendship, instead we always use "who". Correct?

I can't think of an example where 'whose' would work well, so I'll say correct unless you come up with a good example with 'whose'. Emotion: smile

anonymous

Whose parents are Peter and Molly? They are Carla and Ruben's.

In the question above, I understand that "Peter" and "Molly" are the parents, and "Carla" and Ruben" are the children. Is that so?

Right.

CJ

CalifJim
anonymous

Isn't it better in this case to use "who" instead of "whose"? What about these ones:

1. Who is his mother?" Laura (is).

2. Who is Peter's mother? Laura (is).

You can do these several ways, but the ones with "who" are better.

Whose son is he? Laura's. <<< Note how the answer is possessive here.
Whose mother is Peter's? Laura. <<< This one is especially awkward.
Who is his mother? Laura.

CJ

As you must already know by now, question about family relationships using "whose" is where I have problems in understanding.

Could you correct or confirm my conclusions, please?

a) "Whose + common noun + be + Possessive Noun? (awkward and unnatural).

Eg

Whose mother is Peter's? Laura.

b) "Whose + common noun + be + Subject Pronoun/Proper Noun? (Correct and natural).

Whose son is he/Peter? Laura's.

c) "Whose + be + Possessive Noun + Common Noun?

Eg.

Who is Peter's mother? Laura (is). (Correct and natural).

anonymous

Then, we never use "whose" for friendship, instead we always use "who". Correct?

I can't think of an example where 'whose' would work well, so I'll say correct unless you come up with a good example with 'whose'.

Me neither. I can't think of just one example.

anonymous

Whose parents are Peter and Molly? They are Carla and Ruben's.

In the question above, I understand that "Peter" and "Molly" are the parents, and "Carla" and Ruben" are the children. Is that so?

Right.

So, the question is right, isn't it?


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That's a lot to follow. If I understand all that summary of the whole thread, your question boils down to

Is it correct to write "Whose parents are Peter and Molly?"

The answer is yes.

CJ

That's a lot to follow.

Sorry about that. Could you answers just this one, please?

Is it awkward and unnatural the one below?

"Whose + common noun + be + Possessive Noun?

Eg

Whose mother is Peter's? Laura.


*************************************

If I understand all that summary of the whole thread, your question boils down to

Is it correct to write "Whose parents are Peter and Molly?"

The answer is yes.

Got that and thanks a lot for your time, CJ.

BCN

Sorry about that. Could you answers answer just this one, please?

Is it the one below awkward and unnatural the one below?

"Whose + common noun + be + Possessive Noun?

Eg

Whose mother is Peter's? Laura.

Yes, it's awkward and unnatural. Even native speakers have trouble understanding exactly what is being asked. Emotion: smile

CJ

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CalifJim
BCN

Sorry about that. Could you answers answer just this one, please?

I know that, auxiliary + simplr form of the verb

Is it the one below awkward and unnatural the one below?

This one as well. Be + subject + complement.

But thanks for pointing it out!

"Whose + common noun + be + Possessive Noun?

Eg

Whose mother is Peter's? Laura.

Yes, it's awkward and unnatural. Even native speakers have trouble understanding exactly what is being asked.

CJ

I do appreciate your help and patience.

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