I came across this word in an academic document I was proof reading recently, and it seemed to be identical in meaning to 'well-argued'. Is it common usage in an academic context? Or would well-argued be preferable in this case?
I came across this word in an academic document I was proof reading recently, and it seemed to be identical in meaning to 'well-argued'. Is it common usage in an academic context? Or would well-argued be preferable in this case?

I should have added that the actual phrase used was 'well-argumented'.
I came across this word in an academic document I ... academic context? Or would well-argued be preferable in this case?

I should have added that the actual phrase used was 'well-argumented'.

I don't like it.
Google hits:
well-argumented 900
well-argued 600,000
I can't find a dictionary that accepts that "argument" is a verb, but others may.
Adrian
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I came across this word in an academic document I was proof reading recently, and it seemed to be identical in meaning to 'well-argued'. Is it common usage in an academic context? Or would well-argued be preferable in this case?

It's very common in the software-development world, but not with quite the same meaning: To "argument" a programming statement is to add parameters. I imagine the usage could have drifted through from there.
I came across this word in an academic document I ... academic context? Or would well-argued be preferable in this case?

I should have added that the actual phrase used was 'well-argumented'.

I suppose you should be thankful that it wasn't "well-argumentated".
I should have added that the actual phrase used was 'well-argumented'.

I don't like it. Google hits: well-argumented 900

Ye gods. I just looked at the first fold of results. Unbelievable. Every instance means 'well argued'.
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I don't like it. Google hits: well-argumented 900

Ye gods. I just looked at the first fold of results. Unbelievable. Every instance means 'well argued'.

Thanks guys. I Googled as well and, as you did, found some examples in the programming context, but nothing conclusive outside that."well argued" it is then.