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Sir,

I have read that the article "the" is not used before language and nationalities.

but same time I have read like .....

The Chinese are hard working people.

is here Chinese related to nationalities or else.?
What is difference between

A tiger is a dnagerous animal.

The tiger is a dangerous animal.

Waht is difference between generic and indefinite use of the articles.

I am never tired. is this sentence in passive or active voice.

My doubt is, Why "tired" that is past particple of tire ,has been used.

thanks
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I have read that the article "the" is not used before language and nationalities.


I think that may have applied to the names of languages and nationalities used after a form of "to speak" or "to be":

He speaks Chinese. He is Chinese. She speaks Italian. She is Italian.

The use of "the" with nationalities is otherwise not nearly as restricted as your rule implies.
With languages, however, "the" is not used.
A tiger is a dangerous animal.
The tiger is a dangerous animal.
Tigers are dangerous animals.

All three mean the same thing.

The terms "indefinite" and "generic" can be confusing. Mostly, "indefinite" means you don't know which one or you don't care which one; "generic" means you are referring to all of them in general.

Emotion: smile
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"I am never tired" is active, even though it seems passive because of the past participle. Past participles are common as adjectives.

The analogy is "I am never sad." or "I am never happy.", "sad" and "happy" being adjectives.

That said, there may be others who would argue that "I am never tired" is passive, its active counterpart being "Nothing ever tires me".

"I am never heard", however, is definitely passive, because there is no way to interpret "heard" as an adjective in this sentence.
CalifJim"I am never tired" is active, even though it seems passive because of the past participle. Past participles are common as adjectives.

The analogy is "I am never sad." or "I am never happy.", "sad" and "happy" being adjectives.

That said, there may be others who would argue that "I am never tired" is passive, its active counterpart being "Nothing ever tires me".

What does the phrase "that said" mean? Thank you very much for your reply.
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Dear Teo,

It is an interesting phrase. Emotion: smile It is perhaps an ellipsis for «that having been said». It means «nonetheless».

Kind regards, Emotion: smile

Goldmund