+1

I responded to someone on on another forum where someone claimed native English speakers don't make errors, rather any perceived error (from a non-native speaker) is simply a feature of a dialect that they aren't familiar with. I kindly pointed out the errors in that very post which he took graciously. I softened the blow by stating when I'm not paying attention I write like a slob as to not make it personal. Two people afterwards started picking apart one of my corrections in a rather patronizing way. I'm curious for more opinions as a result. I've asked one person so far without pointing out what I consider to be the error and they sniffed out the same error in question. See what you find and under the text I will tell you what the perceived error is. Thank you!

As a guy who learned linguistics off the internet, I can 100% assure you they are not making mistakes. Languages have different dialectics, and the one you know may not be the one they speak. If you spoke English and went to Portugal to learn Portuguese, you are going to have some trouble talking to a person from Brazil, even though they speak the same language. Even English has dialects, though not to the point of say, Spanish. So in short, they aren't making the mistakes, its just they speak slightly different then you.

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So in short, they aren't making the mistakes, it's just they speak slightly different than you.

The controversial correction is the crossed out "the". Is this not an unnecessary use of the article? The other person I asked made the following correction -

So in short, they aren't making any mistakes, it's just they speak slightly different than you.

What say you?

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Comments  (Page 2) 
anonymousdifferent than you.

This would be different from in British English.

anonymous
anonymousdifferent than you.

This would be different from in British English.

My personal observations of British and American speech has it differently.

AmE: different from
BrE: different to

Several friends of mine educated in Britain swear it's "different to", which has always struck me (an American) as bizarre.

CJ

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