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I responded to someone on on another forum where someone claimed native English speakers don't make errors, rather any perceived error (from a non-native speaker) is simply a feature of a dialect that they aren't familiar with. I kindly pointed out the errors in that very post which he took graciously. I softened the blow by stating when I'm not paying attention I write like a slob as to not make it personal. Two people afterwards started picking apart one of my corrections in a rather patronizing way. I'm curious for more opinions as a result. I've asked one person so far without pointing out what I consider to be the error and they sniffed out the same error in question. See what you find and under the text I will tell you what the perceived error is. Thank you!

As a guy who learned linguistics off the internet, I can 100% assure you they are not making mistakes. Languages have different dialectics, and the one you know may not be the one they speak. If you spoke English and went to Portugal to learn Portuguese, you are going to have some trouble talking to a person from Brazil, even though they speak the same language. Even English has dialects, though not to the point of say, Spanish. So in short, they aren't making the mistakes, its just they speak slightly different then you.

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So in short, they aren't making the mistakes, it's just they speak slightly different than you.

The controversial correction is the crossed out "the". Is this not an unnecessary use of the article? The other person I asked made the following correction -

So in short, they aren't making any mistakes, it's just they speak slightly different than you.

What say you?

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anonymousSo in short, they aren't making the mistakes; it's just that they speak slightly different(ly) then than you.
anonymousnative English speakers don't make errors

False. All speakers of all languages occasionally make errors. Those are not errors made through an ignorance of the language, however. They are "performance errors" caused by being tired or distracted, or possibly by talking too fast out of excitement.

CJ

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Thanks for the response, CJ.

Just to clarify, did you find the the to be warranted?

anonymousJust to clarify, did you find the the to be warranted?

I see no reason for 'the' in that sentence. There is no way to retrieve which particular mistakes are being referred to from the context, so it should be an indefinite reference, i.e., without 'the'.

CJ

Okay, thanks for your input.

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anonymousI responded to someone on on another forum where someone claimed native English speakers don't make errors, rather any perceived error (from a non-native speaker) is simply a feature of a dialect that they aren't familiar with.

That often happens, but there is something called standard English, and everybody makes mistakes when they are trying to produce standard English. It happens all the time. The mistakes range from minor infelicities and questionable commas up to wrong words and destructive punctuation. There are those who say that everything any native speaker writes is correct because it is nothing more than a data point in this ever-changing language. But I say that if you write that their coming next weak, you made a mistake, and all the opinions in the world don't change the fact. Writing has to be learned, and you only have to ask yourself how many of the kids you went to school with wanted to learn a lot.

But I say that if you write that their coming next weak, you made a mistake, and all the opinions in the world don't change the fact. Writing has to be learned, and you only have to ask yourself how many of the kids you went to school with wanted to learn a lot.

Exactly. Some mistakes can't be smoothed over so easily.

What did you make of the "the mistake" sentence? Did you find the "the" natural?

anonymousWhat did you make of the "the mistake" sentence?

It takes dedication to edit written matter. Not only is it hard to prevent yourself from just reading it instead of picking it apart, you have to know grammar, usage, punctuation, typography and logic and have broad general knowledge. You thought that there was one mistake in the text you quoted. I see eight.

anonymousDid you find the "the" natural?

That "the" reads like a foreigner's error at first glance. It may be defensible on the grounds that they are the mistakes we're talking about, but if you have to defend it, you should change it to something that does not call attention to itself. If you jolt the reader without meaning to, you have messed up. "Any" is possible and has the right meaning, but a bare "mistakes" achieves the same result better.

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CalifJimFalse. All speakers of all languages occasionally make errors.

That's correct, some people do it a lot more than others.

CalifJimThose are not errors made through an ignorance

That is the case for some people who have little education in language use.


This is related and worth seeing https://www.lingoloop.com/learn-english-online/common-grammar-mistakes-that-native-english-speakers-make/

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