Dear Sir/Madam,
Could you please tell me where I should put the article in the following sentences?
1) .. Queen Elisabeth and .. Duke of Edinburgh have invited.. King of Belgium and .. Queen Fabiola. I've never seen .. Queen on television but I've heard her on the radio.
2) .. Lake Leman is also called .. Lake of Geneva.
3)Do you know how many people have .. moral courage, for instancethe courage of their convictions?
4) .. man is the king of the universe.
5) .. Chineese cooking and .. French cooking are said to be thebest in the world.
6) He is very fond of birds, he has written a book about ..red-headed woodpecker and another about .. ostriches.
7) .. King Henry VIII broke with the Pope and proclaimed himself.. head of .. Church in England.
8) There are many coal mines in Belgium, ... Saar and .. Ruhr.
9) .. memory is one of the most valuable faculties of .. mind.
10) He is learning Greek. -Do you mean .. modern Greek or .. Greekof Plato and Sophocles?
Thank you,
HF
1 2 3 4
} Dear Sir/Madam,
Make up your mind.
} Could you please tell me where I should put the article in the } following sentences?
...
Is this (by any chance) homework? A class assignment? Or just a practice test?

R. J. Valentine
Dear Sir/Madam, Could you please tell me where I should put the article in the following sentences?

Don't worry. Either leave the articles out entirely, or use them ubiquitously; either way you will seem unutterably charming.
1) .. Queen Elisabeth and .. Duke of Edinburgh have invited .. King of Belgium and .. Queen Fabiola. I've never seen .. Queen on television but I've heard her on the radio.

I've seen Queen on television.
2) .. Lake Leman is also called .. Lake of Geneva. 3)Do you know how many people have .. moral courage, for instance the courage of their convictions? 4) .. man is the king of the universe.

Equally laughable with or without the article.
5) .. Chineese cooking and .. French cooking are said to be the best in the world.

"Cooking" should be "cuisine".
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
"
/nq]
5) .. Chineese cooking and .. French cooking are said to be the best in the world.

"
"Cooking" should be "cuisine".
Ain't necessarily so.
Adrian
I see nobody's bothered to answer your questions. It does smell of a homework assignment, which is probably why you didn't get useful responses.
1) .. Queen Elisabeth and .. Duke of Edinburgh have invited .. King of Belgium and .. Queen Fabiola. I've never seen .. Queen on television but I've heard her on the radio.

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh have invited the King of Belgium and Queen Fabiola. I've never seen the Queen on television but I've heard her on the radio.
The formulation "Queen (or Duke) so-and-so" never takes the definite article; the title is the title of a particular named person (a proper noun).
But the formulation "the Queen (or Duke or King) of someplace" takes the definite article; the phrase names a position or office, rather than a particular person. The name of the title may be capitalized, but it is no longer a proper noun.
"the Queen" in the second sentence names the person by the position, (rather than by name) and so takes the definite article.
2) .. Lake Leman is also called .. Lake of Geneva.

Lake Leman is also called the Lake of Geneva.
"Lake Leman" is a proper noun, naming a particular lake, and therefore does not take the defnitite article.
"Lake of Geneva" is not a proper noun, and therefore takes the defnite article.
This one is really funny. The phrase "Lake of Geneva" would almost never occur in American English; it would almost always be "Lake Geneva" instead. But "Lake Geneva" is a proper noun, and therefore would not take the definite article.
3)Do you know how many people have .. moral courage, for instance the courage of their convictions?

Do you know how many people have moral courage,...

"Moral courage" is an uncountable and abstract noun. It makes no sense to use a definite article with it because the defnite article points out a particular instance of the class named. "Moral courage" does not have instances in this sense.
4) .. man is the king of the universe.

Man is king of the universe.
Or...
The man is king of the universe.
The two sentences have very different meanings. The first uses "man" in its general sense, referring to all of humanity. The second implies that one person, out of all of humanity, holds the title "king of the universe."
5) .. Chineese cooking and .. French cooking are said to be the best in the world.

Chinese cooking and French cooking are said to be the best in the world.

Again, it makes no sense to use the defnite article here because there are no particular instances to which the sentence logically refers.
6) He is very fond of birds, he has written a book about .. red-headed woodpecker and another about .. ostriches.

He is very fond of birds, he has written a book about the red-headed woodpecker and another about the ostriches.
He is very fond of birds, he has written a book about the red-headed woodpecker and another about ostriches.
This is an exception to the general rule about the definite article. You may idiomatically use the defnite article in front of the (common name) of a species to refer to the species as a whole. Conceptually, you're taking an instance of the species as an exemplar for the whole species.

The difference between "... ostriches" and "the ostriches" after the comma is that "the ostriches" implies one book about many different species of ostrich, while "... ostriches" lumps all of them into one grouping.
7) .. King Henry VIII broke with the Pope and proclaimed himself .. head of .. Church in England.

King Heny VIII broke with the Pope and proclaimed himself (the) head of the Church in England.
"King Heny VIII" (proper noun; does not take definite article).

"(the) head" "The" may be inserted or not, with little difference in meaning. I might expect "head" to be capitalized (as a title) if the definite article is missing, though.
"the Church in England" refers to a particular instance of the concept "Church." (Question: which Church? Answer: the Church in England.)
8) There are many coal mines in Belgium, ... Saar and .. Ruhr.

I won't venture a guess. Whether or not to use the definite article with a placename is a matter of history and usage, and simply needs to be memorized. Usually, do not use the definite article. But if the placename is (or was originally) descriptive or attributative, then the defnitie article might be proper with that placename.
"Belgium," but "The Netherlands."
9) .. memory is one of the most valuable faculties of .. mind.

Memory is one of the most valuable faculties of the mind.

"Memory" is an abstract and uncountable noun, so doesn't take a definite article.
"Mind" is a strange one, taking the definite article in this sentence, but I can't quite say why. Almost any other noun in the same position would not take the definite article.
10) He is learning Greek. -Do you mean .. modern Greek or .. Greek of Plato and Sophocles?

He is learning Greek. -Do you mean modern Greek or the Greek of Plato and Sophocles?
"modern Greek" the name of a language does not (normally) take the definite article.
"the Greek of Plato and Sophocles" takes the definite article because the phrase points out a particular kind of Greek.
Adam Maass
(. . .) The formulation "Queen (or Duke) so-and-so" never takes the definite article; the title is the title of a particular named person (a proper noun).

If we want to give advice, especially in this newsgroup, to someone who seems to be an ESL (= EFL or ESOL) student of English then we should not represent universal standard English as allowing "Duke" as a prenominal title in the same way that "Queen" can be a prenominal title.

The prenominal title for Queen Elizabeth's husband that's equivalent to the prenominal title "Queen" is "Prince", and in his case it's used as "Prince Philip".

Quentin Burward.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
If we want to give advice, especially in this newsgroup, to someone who seems to be an ESL (= EFL ... Queen Elizabeth's husband that's equivalent tothe prenominal title "Queen" is "Prince", and in his case it's used as "Prince Philip".

1. This is generally correct. Dukes (and other noblemen)are named in English for places, e.g. Kent, Westminster, thus named the Duke of Gloucester, and so forth.
2. But there are exceptions; (English rules are fullof exceptions.) General Douglas Haig was later
ennobled as Earl Haig of Bemersyde: was never
called Lord Bemersyde or The Earl of Bemersyde,
and was always called Lord Haig. This is probably because his personal name was well known and
widely used before he was ennobled. Similarly
Margaret Thatcher when ennobled became
Baroness Thatcher.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
Don Phillipson at (Email Removed) says in (MESSAGE):
If we want to give advice, especially in this newsgroup, ... "Prince", and in his case it's used as "Prince Philip".

1. This is generally correct. Dukes (and other noblemen) are named in English for places, e.g. Kent, Westminster, thus named ... personal name was well known and widely used before he was ennobled. Similarly Margaret Thatcher when ennobled became Baroness Thatcher.

I agree with all of that, Don, and I thank you for extending the discussion in that way. But the "exceptions" that you've mentioned aren't exceptions to any thing I've said about "Duke"; and as far as what not to do is concerned I was talking only about "Duke".

Quentin Burward.
(. . .) The formulation "Queen (or Duke) so-and-so" never ... the title of a particular named person (a proper noun).

If we want to give advice, especially in this newsgroup, to someone who seems to be an ESL (= EFL ... Elizabeth's husband that's equivalent to the prenominal title "Queen" is "Prince", and in his case it's used as "Prince Philip".

True, of course, but Philip is also the Duke of Edinburgh.

In the event that Prince Charles marries Mrs Parker-Bowles and becomes King Charles (the latter being more unlikely than the former, I think) I suppose she would become a duchess. I wonder if protocol would demand that she be addressed as Queen Camilla?

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
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