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In most cases, though, soft paternalism means the government giving people a choice, but skewing the choice towards the one their better selves would like to make. For instance, in many countries plenty of workers fail to enrol in pension schemes and suffer as a result. The reason is not that they have decided against joining, but that they haven't decided at all--and enrolling is cumbersome. So why not make enrolling in the scheme the default option, still leaving them the choice to opt out?
All right, I have two questions about the coloured parts, if anyone could be so kind to explain.

1. Red one. Why not 'a'? I mean I understand that the pensions schemes were mentioned before, but we are not talking about them. So while the collection of the pensions schemes may be definite at the stage where read text appears, any individual scheme in that collection will still be indefinite?

2. Blue one. Why not 'a'? Sure we talked about choices, but in no place in the text we mentioned that there are only two available ones. Where did they get defined?

Thank you very much Emotion: smile
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Somethingsimple


In most cases, though, soft paternalism means the government giving people a choice, but skewing the choice towards the one their better selves would like to make. For instance, in many countries plenty of workers fail to enrol in pension schemes and suffer as a result. The reason is not that they have decided against joining, but that they haven't decided at all--and enrolling is cumbersome. So why not make enrolling in the scheme the default option, still leaving them the choice to opt out?
All right, I have two questions about the coloured parts, if anyone could be so kind to explain.

1. Red one. Why not 'a'? I mean I understand that the pensions schemes were mentioned before, but we are not talking about them. So while the collection of the pensions schemes may be definite at the stage where read text appears, any individual scheme in that collection will still be indefinite?

2. Blue one. Why not 'a'? Sure we talked about choices, but in no place in the text we mentioned that there are only two available ones. Where did they get defined?

Thank you very much Emotion: smile

"The" could easily be replaced by "a" there. Probably though, the writer wants to say "the scheme offered by the company". It seems to mean that to me. "The" is correct in that one because we can only have one default option in each situation.
Hi,

In spite of the fact that I don't have the full knowledge of the complete text, I would say the whole sentence in red and blue colors is poorly written, if not incorrect grammatically as it is.

So why not make enrolling in the scheme the default option, still leaving them the choices to opt out.
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Milky"The" could easily be replaced by "a" there. Probably though, the writer wants to say "the scheme offered by the company".

Sure, but why in the phrase above '... plenty of workers fail to enrol in pension schemes and ..." the writer droped 'the'? Seems that the implied 'the schemes offered by companies' should have been relevent there as well.

Cheers,
Al.